Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Damaged Gear Teeth

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Damaged Gear Teeth

    I have an Ingersoll lawn tractor that’s about 10 yrs. old. It’s in excellent shape except for one problem. Some of the teeth have stripped off one of the steering gears. The steering shaft runs almost vertically from the steering wheel down to below the frame of the tractor. On the lower end of the shaft is a crescent shaped flat steering gear that is about 2-1/2 “ wide by 4 inches long. The steering shaft connects near one edge at the center of the gear. Gear teeth are located along the opposite edge of the gear, along the outer radius over about a 140 degree arc. Each tooth is about 5/16” deep by 5/16” wide. The gear is approximately 3/16” – 1/4 “ thick. A replacement part is difficult to locate and expensive if I do. [This isn’t the first time it has happened. But now the source of the problem has been identified and corrected.] I have time on my hands and am wondering if I could use weld to build up the damaged gear teeth and then grind or file them back into the proper profile? And could I expect the repair to last?
    I have a H140 MIG welder. Since I’m not joining two pieces of steel, I am unsure of what settings to use on the welder if I do give it a try. What kind of heat and wire feed settings should I use? Thanks!

  • #2
    I have extreme problems visualizing other peoples stuff but if I am I think you will be ok. If it wears out in a few years do it again.

    Comment


    • #3
      I reckon you could test the hardness of it but the cost of hardfacing it I think would not be worth it. I never actually done it before.

      Comment


      • #4
        Regular mild steel wire will likely wear quickly, but it will work. Is this equipment heavily used?
        Miller dynasty 350
        Miller syncrowave 250
        Miller deltaweld 450
        Miller cp-300
        And one fancy microwelding setup

        Comment


        • #5
          Does it appear to be mild steel? I'm thinking a bunch of those are like a pot metal.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Sandy View Post
            Does it appear to be mild steel? I'm thinking a bunch of those are like a pot metal.
            As Sandy indicates, you have to identify the base metal to properly answer your question. Are you familiar with spark testing? If not, look up a chart and give it a try.

            Comment


            • #7
              I’m not sure about spark testing and will look into it as suggested. I don’t believe the gear is made out of anything special; tool steel, or cast. The gear that is broken was replaced just last year. The material that the gear is made of may be part of the problem. The teeth are definitely not cracked off. They appear most worn off or burred and rolled of at the end, sides, and tip.

              What I originally needed was settings for my H140 welder for power and wire speeds if I do go ahead and try repairs. I could understand keeping the power up for penetration and wire speed down to minimum and not creating any excessively large deposits of weld. Any help? Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Hunt6246 View Post
                I’m not sure about spark testing and will look into it as suggested. I don’t believe the gear is made out of anything special; tool steel, or cast. The gear that is broken was replaced just last year. The material that the gear is made of may be part of the problem. The teeth are definitely not cracked off. They appear most worn off or burred and rolled of at the end, sides, and tip.

                What I originally needed was settings for my H140 welder for power and wire speeds if I do go ahead and try repairs. I could understand keeping the power up for penetration and wire speed down to minimum and not creating any excessively large deposits of weld. Any help? Thanks!
                If the gear is steel or cast steel, you will probably be using your 140 at its top settings on both voltage and wire speed.
                However, from what you have described, the gear material sounds like soft aluminum or pot metal of the cheapest variety, not any type of steel. How heavy is it compared to steel, cast steel, or cast iron?

                What was the problem you corrected, and if it was corrected, why didn't the gear last 10 years, as the original did? Was excessive steering force involved? How about a picture?

                Comment


                • #9
                  This is a common problem on lawn tractors. It is a steel gear that is very over priced on most tractors. Good luck as it should be a fun project.
                  Fireman Bill

                  HH 210 MVP
                  MM 211
                  Spoolmate 100
                  Lotas LTP5000D Plasma
                  Oxy/Accet (Victor)
                  Wards AC/DC buzz box
                  30 ton old hyd press
                  A few brand name tools
                  A bunch of cheap tools
                  A wife to worry me and
                  4 dogs to supervise me

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I built up a couple for a guy a few years ago. They are still going strong.
                    Walker
                    Chief slag chipper & floor sweeper
                    Ironwood Artistic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would try to build it back up with weld and assuming the base meta has a carbon content (if it is in fact cast steel of forged steel ).I would try to harden by heating with a torch then soaking it while the part is red hot in everyday motor oil ,this will cure the part and harden it. It might not be as proficient as hardfacing it . But the cost to hardface and the time to put into it might not be worth it as said before. Besides Hardening it with a torch is simple and cost friendly if it does not work, you could always come back and hardface.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Any chance of some good pictures of what the assembly looks like assembled? Can the mower be flipped on it's side for a foto session?
                        Mike

                        sigpic WHEELED VEHICLE SERVICE SINCE 1960

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X