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  • Ready to buy a new welder

    I'm ready to buy a new welder and would like some inputs. I will be using it to weld 1/8 to 1/4 mostly. Possibly a little bigger.

    I thought I had narrowed it down to the Miller 211mvp (1080 at lws) or the Hobart 210mvp. Really like the idea of being able to take it with me. But I wonder about duty cycle when welding 1/4. Any one using either one of these to weld 1/4?

    But then thought I might be better off going with a slightly bigger unit. Miller 212 or Lincoln 211. Both cost around 1600 at lws. Then I came across the Ironman 230 which can be found for less then 1600.

    So many choices....

    All ideas and thoughts welcomed.

    Thanks

  • #2
    hi, here's my local welding suppliers website. great to deal with and great prices, check it out.

    http://www.weldersupply.com/products...es|Mig+Welding

    Are you going to be welding where DUTY CYCLE will be a concern ?? This is a important issue. I'm a MILLER guy when it comes to welders and the 211 is a great machine. Is the best buck for the money. It's kind of portable compare to the 212 or 252. Like all the guy say you can't use amps you don't have. The 211 at 150 amps is 30% duty cycle while the 212 at 160 amps is 60%. The 211 is 74 pounds and 212 is 178 pounds. As long as you are this far ,what about the 252?????????????????????? It's only money and the guys on these sites have no problem helping you spend yours. Plus, you can't just have ONE machine!! GOOD LUCK

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    • #3
      I have no idea if duty cycle is going to be an issue. How would you really determine this?
      I currently have an old lincoln 100 and works for most things I have done. I need a bigger welder for the projects I want to tackle now that I bought a tractor.

      I know 1600 is about the most I want to spend. Just don't want to buy a new welder and wish I had gone bigger. The more I think about it I don't really need the 110 capability as I have the old lincoln. But if the 211 will handle 1/4" then I could spend the 600 I save on material.

      Comment


      • #4
        we dont know what you want to do with your welder and is more often than not even the person buying it doesnt know either. some folks buy it and only use it an hour before it collects dust.

        this is a machine that interests me. http://www.hobartwelders.com/weldtal...t-do-you-think

        i have a 250 amp machine but the esab pretty much would have me covered. if duty cycle became an issue i think i would just learn how to work around that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by trailrider View Post
          I have no idea if duty cycle is going to be an issue. How would you really determine this?
          I currently have an old lincoln 100 and works for most things I have done. I need a bigger welder for the projects I want to tackle now that I bought a tractor.

          I know 1600 is about the most I want to spend. Just don't want to buy a new welder and wish I had gone bigger. The more I think about it I don't really need the 110 capability as I have the old lincoln. But if the 211 will handle 1/4" then I could spend the 600 I save on material.
          What projects? What metals? What thickness?

          Comment


          • #6
            Projects so far on MY list are 8' landscape rake (3 point)
            3 point carry all
            tilt box trailer to pull behind tractor
            Then a tow able grain bin.

            I would say allot of 1/4" material is not thicker for the 3 point braces.

            Thanks,

            Matt
            Last edited by trailrider; 02-04-2012, 07:17 AM.

            Comment


            • #7
              A 211 will but is not a real good 1/4 unit, there is no argument the 235 is superior. I think often 120V is over rated, I never move my migs. I think top end power is more of an issue than duty cycle especially for hobby and small shop. All this is slightly different when one is doing for living and/or paying men, the 235 is so much faster.
              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

              Comment


              • #8
                hi,did searching on MILLER site for duty cycle, good reading for you.

                http://ezinearticles.com/?Welder-Dut...ess&id=2414619

                http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ght=duty+cycle

                http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ght=duty+cycle

                http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...ght=duty+cycle

                Here's a thread on dualshield on 1/4" http://weldingweb.com/showthread.php?t=63270

                Comment


                • #9
                  check this out, I'm sure other manufactures have something similar buy I prefer Millers.

                  http://www.millerwelds.com/pdf/MMMBG.pdf

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    try a Hobart 210

                    It is heavy so not really as portable as people think. The drive setup in the hobart is where they cut corners. It is mostly plastic. The miller is mostly cast aluminum. The hobart is tap, but has 7 taps. I have not come across a situation where one tap is too cold and the other is too hot with this machine. The bigger machines such as a Lincoln 216 has 7 taps also. There is a big step between those taps though.
                    Miller's has "infinate control" but the taps generally have a softer arc with a wider "sweet spot".
                    If you buy a Miller 180 or Hobart 190/210 buy a better ground clamp. A Lenco (rebadged as a Weldmark sometimes) 300 amp clamp works great. Many erratic arc or penetration problems are caused by a poor quality/arcing ground clamp.
                    The bigger machines have 15 foot gun. Pushing.023" or even.030" for 15 feet doesn't work very well. I would stick with .035" solid or .045" flux-core if you end up with a full size machine and 15' gun.
                    Last edited by gatemaker; 02-04-2012, 10:30 AM.
                    fence and gate shop worker
                    At home...
                    Lincoln Power MIG 180....
                    Winco 6000 watt generator (13 hp Honda) "Big Jake"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You really haven't said what you intend to do, owning a tractor and welding 1/4 inch is kind of vague. For what it's worth, any of the 180 to 210 amp machines can easily weld from roughly 20 gauge sheet metal to 5/16 or 3/8 inch with .030 wire and C25 gas. On 1/4 inch, your duty cycle will be 30-40%. All the time you spend relocating your welding hand, the material, etc. are "rest" time, so that's not as restrictive as you think. A 110 volt unit, turned up to max, would struggle and probably be at 20% duty cycle.

                      I've had good luck with the inexpensive work clamp that came with my 210, but when I see a quality brass clamp on sale I'll buy it and consider it money well spent. I didn't hestitate to buy a cart on sale after lugging it for the second time; it's about as portable as a 12 x 18 inch cinder block!

                      I don't know why they just don't throw one like this in and charge $5 more. http://www.tractorsupply.com/hobart-...p-300a-3822621
                      Last edited by Blacksmith; 02-04-2012, 12:59 PM.
                      Blacksmith
                      Stickmate LX AC/DC
                      Big cheap (Chinese) Anvil
                      Hand cranked coal forge
                      Freon bottle propane forge
                      HH 210 and bottle of C25

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Go with the Ironman 230, you'll never regret having the significant increase into top end power and duty cycle that the 230 offers over the compact 210 amp units.


                        http://store.cyberweld.com/hoir230migwe.html
                        MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                        Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                        PM 180C



                        HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by trailrider View Post
                          I have no idea if duty cycle is going to be an issue. How would you really determine this?
                          I currently have an old lincoln 100 and works for most things I have done. I need a bigger welder for the projects I want to tackle now that I bought a tractor.

                          I know 1600 is about the most I want to spend. Just don't want to buy a new welder and wish I had gone bigger. The more I think about it I don't really need the 110 capability as I have the old lincoln. But if the 211 will handle 1/4" then I could spend the 600 I save on material.
                          If 1600 is the most you want to spend, I also think that the Ironman 230 represents your best buy for your dollar, since this unit will easily do what you have in mind, and more, which is what you say you want. As far as portability is concerned, you could easily run this up a ramp and into the back of a pickup, and as Sberry pointed out, you aren't going to be mig welding out in your field anyway.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            "The bigger machines have 15 foot gun. Pushing.023" or even.030" for 15 feet doesn't work very well."...

                            gatemaker:

                            Where have you found reports that indicate this?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              15' guns

                              I use Lincoln 215's 5 days a week and have for years. We have not had much luck with them pushing .030" wire consistently and smoothly. I am refering to day to day use with less-than-perfect liners. I know people do feed smaller wire but their machines have clean, unkinked liners, and guns that are not used as hammers. Because of this we use .035" wire only. Both Tweco an tregakiss make the full-size guns in 10' and 12' also.
                              Last edited by gatemaker; 02-04-2012, 09:06 PM.
                              fence and gate shop worker
                              At home...
                              Lincoln Power MIG 180....
                              Winco 6000 watt generator (13 hp Honda) "Big Jake"

                              Comment

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