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  • Mig Welder

    Im looking to buy a mig welder, I live on a farm where we use a welder alot, I was looking into buying a hobart Ironman 230, what do u think?

  • #2
    Don't walk, run or ride a horse down and get one.
    http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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    • #3
      I haven't used an ironman 230, but i have used other hobart equipment. I liked them real well. Dan speaks highly of the Horbart 230. That is good enough for me.

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      • #4
        Hitch up the buckboard and get ye to town.
        --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

        Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
        -------------------------

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        • #5
          I feel the duty cycle and top end power level of the Ironman 230 make it a good shop machine for a small to mid range sized farm.

          Set up with an .035 solid wire and C 25 shielding gas the Ironman 230 offers enough top end power to produce very sound welds on 3/8" or 1/2" steel. Truthfully, I'd have no issue using the Ironman 230 on steel as thick as 1". However, if you'll be using the unit to weld large volumes of 1/2" or thicker steel, I'd probably take a step up in machine size and go with a Millermatic 252, Lincoln Power MIG 256, or ESAB Migmaster 280.
          Last edited by Dan; 11-28-2011, 09:22 PM.
          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


          PM 180C



          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

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          • #6
            I think you made a good selection with the Ironman 230.
            Esab Multimaster 260 Sweet machine!
            Thermal Arc Arc Master, Don't use it much just got a heck of a deal on this unit
            Don't talk about it, be about it.

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            • #7
              I would go with an ironman 230 or thermal arc 210 or thermal arc 251..
              Thermal arc is also coming out with a 252i inverter machine that is mig/dc-tig/stick/spoolgun
              .

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              • #8
                Originally posted by brucer View Post
                I would go with an ironman 230 or thermal arc 210 or thermal arc 251..
                Thermal arc is also coming out with a 252i inverter machine that is mig/dc-tig/stick/spoolgun
                Looks like brucer likes thermal arc..

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                • #9
                  maybe if you pre-heat the heck into it first

                  To properly weld 1/2" material spray transfer is the best way to go out of the wire processes. They'd call that machine a xx300 if it had the nuts to spray .045 with any real authority.. .045 being my smallest choice for 1/2" steel.

                  For 1"??? Absolutely impractical.
                  Mike

                  sigpic WHEELED VEHICLE SERVICE SINCE 1960

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by laman View Post
                    Looks like brucer likes thermal arc..
                    I like the quality of my TA 185, I also like the looks of the Ironman 230 and was planning to buy one, now that I've seen the Thermal Arc that has come out, the 181i and the new 252i getting ready to come out i'm rethinking my choices..

                    I will probably wait until spring to purchase now, from what i'm hearing, Thermal arc is introducing a couple new models.. I've also heard of a dual voltage mig/dc-tig/stick/spoolgun around the 200amp range they were suppose to be introducing..
                    Last edited by brucer; 11-29-2011, 05:36 PM.
                    .

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                    • #11
                      Related to this, I'm looking for a general use welder to have around the farm. I won't be needing to weld anything over 1/4" thick, some steel, and possibly a little aluminum. How is the Handler 140?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aerocycle View Post
                        Related to this, I'm looking for a general use welder to have around the farm. I won't be needing to weld anything over 1/4" thick, some steel, and possibly a little aluminum. How is the Handler 140?
                        The Handler 140 is underpowered for your application. Realistically the 140 is best suited for 1/8" and thinner steel. I wouldn't even consider

                        If you're wanting to go with a compact light duty unit. For your stated application the Hobart unit that I'd recommend going with would be a Handler 210 MVP. I don't consider the Handler 190 to be a bad choice either. The additional top end power (230V input) the Handler 210 MVP offers could come in handy. The 120V input capability of the MVP might be a beneficial option too.
                        MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                        Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                        PM 180C



                        HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by old blue View Post
                          To properly weld 1/2" material spray transfer is the best way to go out of the wire processes. They'd call that machine a xx300 if it had the nuts to spray .045 with any real authority.. .045 being my smallest choice for 1/2" steel.

                          For 1"??? Absolutely impractical.
                          By no means am I recommending using the Ironman 230 for a production style application (large volume) on 1/2" or thicker steel.

                          Growing up on a small farm (50 -75 acres) and having relatives that owned larger farms (300+ acres) most of my welding over the years on 1/2" and thicker steel, during a welding session, has consisted of a small number of relatively short welds (1" - 12" long range).

                          Set up with an .035 wire and C25, If you crank the output up on the Ironman 230, it'll produce a high energy arc that'll burn in (penetrate) good on 1/2" or thicker steel. Spray transfer will of course produce a cleaner running, but for farm application usage I consider the level of spatter that the Ironman 230 produces to be acceptable. For the power level the spatter level is actually light. Besides if desired a light coat of anti- spatter will keep the spatter from sticking to the base metal. Once again, my thinking isn't towards high volume welding, so 1/2" or thicker would be done best in multiple passes.

                          An example of the type of 1" thick application I was thinking about, would be like the time my Dad purchased a cover crop disc cheap because the tongue was damaged and one side needed to be welded back together. The tongue was constructed out of 1" X 4" flat bar. The repair required me to weld one joint that was a little over 4" long.
                          MigMaster 250- Smooth arc with a good touch of softness to it. Good weld puddle wetout. Light spatter producer.
                          Ironman 230 - Soft arc with a touch of agressiveness to it. Very good weld puddle wet out. Light spatter producer.


                          PM 180C



                          HH 125 EZ - impressive little fluxcore only unit

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dan View Post
                            The Handler 140 is underpowered for your application. Realistically the 140 is best suited for 1/8" and thinner steel. I wouldn't even consider

                            If you're wanting to go with a compact light duty unit. For your stated application the Hobart unit that I'd recommend going with would be a Handler 210 MVP. I don't consider the Handler 190 to be a bad choice either. The additional top end power (230V input) the Handler 210 MVP offers could come in handy. The 120V input capability of the MVP might be a beneficial option too.
                            Okay, thanks a bunch, i'll keep saving and hope to get a great deal. I was a little skeptical about the HH140
                            's ability.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dan View Post
                              By no means am I recommending using the Ironman 230 for a production style application (large volume) on 1/2" or thicker steel.

                              Growing up on a small farm (50 -75 acres) and having relatives that owned larger farms (300+ acres) most of my welding over the years on 1/2" and thicker steel, during a welding session, has consisted of a small number of relatively short welds (1" - 12" long range).

                              Set up with an .035 wire and C25, If you crank the output up on the Ironman 230, it'll produce a high energy arc that'll burn in (penetrate) good on 1/2" or thicker steel. Spray transfer will of course produce a cleaner running, but for farm application usage I consider the level of spatter that the Ironman 230 produces to be acceptable. For the power level the spatter level is actually light. Besides if desired a light coat of anti- spatter will keep the spatter from sticking to the base metal. Once again, my thinking isn't towards high volume welding, so 1/2" or thicker would be done best in multiple passes.

                              An example of the type of 1" thick application I was thinking about, would be like the time my Dad purchased a cover crop disc cheap because the tongue was damaged and one side needed to be welded back together. The tongue was constructed out of 1" X 4" flat bar. The repair required me to weld one joint that was a little over 4" long.
                              I don't usually copy long posts but this is good. This one subject could be written about extensively, I can respond to a post but am not a good enough writer to do the book. Like Dan, I really try to consider and from the language not to forget who I am talking to, the nature of the question, whether the answer can be exact, maybe a generalization is adequate.
                              I am a career welder as well as a farmer and in my application after 10 yrs in the trades which I really got around thru apprenticeship and by nature of being a general fukkoff, 10 more of anything and everything contracting, and the last 10 primarily working on my own **** in a farm operation, not so much big equipment but lots, most used, some old, have modified my share of new too, but thousands of pieces, I could get by quite nicely with a 230. Where I would want a second unit or 2 from there barring I had some special application, (disclaimer) would be a 210 compact with the spool gun option and a Maxstar 150 or better. If I was demanding in the shop for stick,,, maybe a 200 but for the money the 150 class or hate to say this the thermal, (I like the blue paint).
                              I would keep the 210 near the workbench loaded with 030 and my second bottle on a cart and as much cord as I needed. You can do exhaust work with this setup without having to fiddle changing out as well as most all the rest of the sheet metal found in this work these days especially due to salvaged parts and modern engineering which has gotten substantially lighter over last few years.
                              Heck, seen 1/4 plate leak where guy used 250 class welder and heavy wire,,, dipstick just doesn't realize it was so clod, etc, on other hand I weld to a 2 inch plate without problem, etc, there is that factor, but,,, again to quote the nature of Dan, I got to think back to the last time I make a heavy weld in my shop, if it was, likely on the machine, maybe uphill, etc.
                              I repair a forklift, a customer deal, day was I would to have had to use service truck, now a Maxstar @ 120V, about 4 inches of it was really heavy, made another pass, 2 or 3 more rods, the other foot, maybe 18 inches was ripped out light plate, single pass butt with a little gap. Was a thing of beauty not having to hear loud azz engine, fit, repair, tack, weld a little.
                              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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