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  • Flux cored welding with CO2?

    I was talking to one of the guys at the local welding supply shop yesterday about any recommendations he had for welding 1/4" to 1/4" with my 140 other than the proper prep, beveling, and multiple passes. He said that since I'm using flux cored wire that adding Co2 would help penentration and make for less cleanup. Does this actually work? Or would I be better off saving the money and doing a really good prep job? Pros and cons? thanks guys
    HH140

  • #2
    Score one more piece of abonimable advice from a LWS Counter Expert.

    Flux cored wires that are designed to be self shielding do not benefit from running CO2. In fact, in most cases it can be detrimental and cause changes in the metallurgy of the filler metal. There is no gas-shielded flux core wire (sometimes called "Dual Shield") that will run on a Handler 140 and there is no self-shielded wire that's designed to run with additional gas shielding.

    Oh, and I can't believe you actually asked if you'd be better off just doing the job correctly, but... yes. You would.
    Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
    Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

    Victor Superrange II * Victor Journeyman

    Hobart HH 125EZ


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    • #3
      It's also possible that he misheard you and thought you weren't using flux cored wire, hence his recommendation for you to use CO2.

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      • #4
        ok thanks guys. lol I can't believe I said that either now that I think about it. I planned on doing a really good prep job anyway. So far I've cleaned the surface as best as possible, before and after every bead Like you guys say, prep is everything.

        Don't think he misheard me. I specifically told him I was using flux cored wire because all of my welding is outside. Who knows what he was thinkin... that's the exact reason why I asked since most of you guys think counter monkey's don't know jack sh*t.

        Speaking of prep work, other than grinding, brushing, beveling, etc, would it benefit me to clean the surface with acetone? I've been reading the "Welder's Handbook" and it's recommended a few times. Is there something better to use?
        HH140

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Novanate70 View Post
          Speaking of prep work, other than grinding, brushing, beveling, etc, would it benefit me to clean the surface with acetone? I've been reading the "Welder's Handbook" and it's recommended a few times. Is there something better to use?
          I also have the "Welder's Handbook". One of the other recommendations the author makes is to use a metal etching solution created from Muriatic Acid. I was able to find the acid at Ace Hardware, and used a diluted solution to prep some metal. It worked very well for removing light rust.

          Just make sure you have lots of ventilation and wear eye protection and gloves. I sprayed it on some mild steel in my garage with the door open, then left for about 10 minutes to let it work.

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          • #6
            Thanks I'll have to look into that.
            HH140

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            • #7
              Oh, yeah... about Finch's book... you might want to take things you read in there with the same caution as LWS counterman advice...
              Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
              Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

              Victor Superrange II * Victor Journeyman

              Hobart HH 125EZ


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              • #8
                Originally posted by Zrexxer View Post
                Oh, yeah... about Finch's book... you might want to take things you read in there with the same caution as LWS counterman advice...
                Was that wink purely for sarcasm, or does that guy actually give some sketchy advice? I only ask because it seemed like a pretty good high-level overview of welding, but having no formal training I can't say if the material he teaches was good/bad/bs/otherwise.

                I try to be a little skeptical of everything I read.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Zrexxer View Post
                  Score one more piece of abonimable advice from a LWS Counter Expert.

                  Flux cored wires that are designed to be self shielding do not benefit from running CO2. In fact, in most cases it can be detrimental and cause changes in the metallurgy of the filler metal. There is no gas-shielded flux core wire (sometimes called "Dual Shield") that will run on a Handler 140 and there is no self-shielded wire that's designed to run with additional gas shielding.

                  Oh, and I can't believe you actually asked if you'd be better off just doing the job correctly, but... yes. You would.
                  Could not have said it better. Flux core is fluxed already. Period!
                  Millermatic 135 110v .030 Flux-Core Wire

                  Have a Jeep Cherokee? Click Here!

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                  • #10
                    I just read some of the Amazon reviews for "Welder's Handbook" and there are a few bad reviews that point out inaccuracies and so forth.

                    I found it helpful, but looking back I do agree there could have been more photos of welds and welding techniques and less pictures of clean shops, etc.

                    I also remember looking at the welding cart plans thinking it would be a good first project, but I couldn't figure out how to build some of it. Keep in mind someone that's done this type of work before would probably find it obvious, but being a beginner I found myself wanting more pictures of the finished product from multiple angles, and more drawings showing different parts of the table, how they fit together, and how to approach fit-up and welding.

                    I've heard many times on this forum that the Miller educational $25 kit is worth every penny. I found some great technical info on MIG at the ESAB site as well: (http://www.esabna.com/EUWeb/MIG_handbook/592mig1_1.htm)

                    Any suggestions on other welding guides?

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                    • #11
                      I've been having the same problem with this book. It's almost like he's avoiding the part about actually laying down a bead. There's a serious lack of useful pictures.The biggest thing that's killing me is that all he talks about is airplanes and racecars. Right now I'm getting more info from everyone on here and using the book more for the theory than a guide.
                      HH140

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                      • #12
                        Finch

                        talks about.......

                        himself and the companies that provide him with ????

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                        • #13
                          good point. My co-worker lent me a book called "learn how to weld **** near anything" by jessie james. Looking through it it was actually written by finch and was almost identical to the welders handbook.
                          HH140

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ricbob View Post
                            I just read some of the Amazon reviews for "Welder's Handbook" and there are a few bad reviews that point out inaccuracies and so forth.
                            I wrote the review on Amazon that pissed Finch off so bad he registered there just write a rebuttal.
                            Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
                            Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

                            Victor Superrange II * Victor Journeyman

                            Hobart HH 125EZ


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                            • #15
                              Novanate70,

                              Are you actually having problems? or are you just imagining problems you don't have?

                              Most flux-cored wires, will handle a certain amount of contaminants, whether mill-scale, a little rust, a little oil.

                              Same for most stick rods. Likewise, up to a point, even mig wires.

                              You should stop reading, start running beads, if necessary, just practice beads, and break them open, look inside. Practice and observation will teach you much more than reading, or advice, from unqualified people.
                              *** Disclaimer ***

                              As I have no wish to toy with anybody's life, I suggest you take this and all other posts with a certain amount of skepticism. Carefully evaluate, and if necessary, research on your own any suggestions or advice you might pick up here, especially those from my posts, as I obviously haven't the skill and experience exhibited by some of the more illustrious and more successful members of this forum. I'm not responsible for anything I say, as I drank toxic water when young.

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