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  • HH handler 140 good or bad

    im thinking of buying a handler 140 but im not sure how good it is. so if anyone has any info on this MIG rig i will consider it in my purchase.

  • #2
    Excellent unit! Very highly regarded! Especially great on sheet metal (with gas).
    "Good Enough Never Is"

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Hotfoot View Post
      Excellent unit! Very highly regarded! Especially great on sheet metal (with gas).
      whats the thickest it can run?

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      • #4
        Look up the specs on the Hobart site. If your are wanting to weld thick steel, no 110 volt machine is going to get you there. You can do multiple passes, using flux core, but I doubt if you'll get safely over 3/8", but that's just a guess.
        "Good Enough Never Is"

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        • #5
          HH140 is rated for 24 gage to 1/4" steel.

          IMHO, I would suggest anything over 3/16" or so would have to be done in multiple passes with the 140. Excellent machine for its size and limitations and being a 120vac machine and light in weight, gives it portability.
          -Bob (JalopyBldr)

          HH187
          13" SBL

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Hotfoot View Post
            Look up the specs on the Hobart site. If your are wanting to weld thick steel, no 110 volt machine is going to get you there. You can do multiple passes, using flux core, but I doubt if you'll get safely over 3/8", but that's just a guess.
            Excuse the question since I have never welded. Why must you use flux core wire for multiple passes as opposed to regular wire?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by pkucan View Post
              Excuse the question since I have never welded. Why must you use flux core wire for multiple passes as opposed to regular wire?
              You don't need to for multiple passes.

              However, using the flux core wire will give you additional penetration vs. solid core, which is helpful (along with the multiple passes) when welding thicker material with a lower powered welder.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Vector View Post
                You don't need to for multiple passes.

                However, using the flux core wire will give you additional penetration vs. solid core, which is helpful (along with the multiple passes) when welding thicker material with a lower powered welder.
                how so?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by usa1327 View Post
                  how so?
                  Essentially flux wire gives more penetration because it's got a smaller cross-sectional area (it's hollow because the core is filled with flux). Same amperage, smaller cross-section, more penetration. That's my understanding of the physics behind it, anyhow. A more experienced weldor can probably explain things in more detail.

                  I've been told to run 0.23 wire in a case where a cheap machine I was using couldn't get decent penetration, for the same reason (I had been running 0.30). (turned out my machine was just a POS and nothing was going to make it do better than 1/8" in a single pass, regardless of what I did, so I got a Hobart to replace it ).

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                  • #10
                    Anyhow, to answer the original question. For a 110v unit, the Handler 140 is a great one, with the caveat that the duty cycle isn't appropriate for heavy-duty work. It is more than enough for most hobbiest weldors, however.

                    Like any other 110v welder, it's not going to have enough current to weld really thick stuff in a single pass. Maybe you can get away with 1/4" running flux core wire in a single pass if the joint is properly prepped, but that's about it. That's just the physics of a 15A 110V circuit as the supply, not the fault of the Handler 140.

                    If you need to be welding nearly continuously (and I'm thinking you won't because you wouldn't be asking us this is you welded for a living), then you'd want to look at the Miller units rather than the Hobart.

                    If you know for a fact that you're going to be doing thicker stuff on a regular basis, you will want to step up to a 220v unit.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Vector View Post
                      If you need to be welding nearly continuously (and I'm thinking you won't because you wouldn't be asking us this is you welded for a living), then you'd want to look at the Miller units rather than the Hobart.
                      The Miller Matic 140 has bascially the same limitations as the Hobart
                      machine -- as you say, it's physics...

                      For welding heavier stuff or for more continuous welding, you really
                      should step up a level or two...

                      Frank

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by fjk View Post
                        The Miller Matic 140 has bascially the same limitations as the Hobart
                        machine -- as you say, it's physics...

                        For welding heavier stuff or for more continuous welding, you really
                        should step up a level or two...

                        Frank
                        i only have about $600 to use though.

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                        • #13
                          I was recently trying to decide on a welder and considered the 140. Decided on the 187 though and so far, so good. I started this thread and suggest you read through it - some very helpful info there! I bought the HH187 at Tractor Supply. Their list WAS $600, but I see it just went up to $680!! Also, the HH210 was $800...now $900! Glad I bought when I did!!! You can occasionally find 10%-off coupons on their web site.

                          The 187 and 210 are 240v machines though, if that's a problem for you.
                          Michael

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                          • #14
                            hey usa so you found you way over here from the miller fourm now. anyway i have the 140 and i love it, if im correct you dont have access to 240V right? so this is a good welder for you.
                            Dylan

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                            • #15
                              Wow, glad I bought my 187 when I did too about a month ago. Mine was $539 with the 10% coupon. I thought about choosing between the 140 and 187, which ended up being $100 more for the 187....a no brainer! Really glad I went with the 187, as I think running the 187 at lower taps than the 140 at higher taps to do 1/8"+ actually causes me less grief, power and breaker-wise.

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