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tool to (cut / punch), square holes for carriage bolts?

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  • tool to (cut / punch), square holes for carriage bolts?

    this is for 1/8 inch steel, I am working on an idea and having a nut or head of a bolt on one side would not work,

    yes I know there are broaches, that one can use a press on and push the broach through a pre drilled hole,

    that is slow, and I do not have a (iron worker), is there some type of punch that one could place in a pre drilled hole, and hitting with a 2 lb sledge hammer or similar, punching the corners out, I know there would have to be a die under the punch, and some way to line up the die and punch, or with some type of simple press?

    is this type of tool made,

    or something else made that is affordable,

  • #2


    I fabed up a tapered square drift for doing carriage bolts in a hinge I was making... Need to hot punch material through.... Its a blacksmithing sort of thing....

    Dale

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    Last edited by Dale M.; 11-29-2018, 04:16 PM.
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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    • #3
      https://www.thefabricator.com/articl...f-slug-pulling

      Don't they say, the thicker the crust the harder the chew? If after following the attached link and reading doesn't answer your questions,what size are your carriage bolts, how long and how many holes?
      Image result for serrated bolt head

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      • #4
        Yep, you may want the same thing used for studs on car wheel hubs. They are harder to install, but they stay put when nothing is nutted to them, also.

        Another option if you insist on a squarish hole might be to use a small drill on the four corners before using the larger drill for the center diameter. Far fewer file strokes will be needed before it is square enough to use for a carriage bolt.

        And with the few details provided in the OP, another option worth mentioning is just to weld a stud onto the steel sheet.

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        • #5
          Mac wins. It only hurt a bit to admit it but by golly...weld a stud is the winner to solving the problem. As he as well mentioned, the OP provided few details. Could be a secret? Could also be a darn good reason for a welded stud in place of a carriage bolt not to work? G for grind flush?
          But Mac mentioned welding and that to me is a winning answer to a lot of problems.
          Actual stud welder. Drill and plug weld a stud. A run a bead around something stud. I'm going to tip my hat to that.

          However. 1/8" mild steel is pretty soft. If all a person is trying to do is keep a carriage bolts from turning, to allow nutting up, I'm sure with a minor allowance in hole size to the larger, A tight hole in a heavy object...say the back hole in a anvil, a sharp hard blow with a good size hammer, that bolts going in cold and forming a square shoulder.

          But if you want to nut up and nut off a carriage bolt many times, Mac wins with solid.



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          • #6
            Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
            ...Drill and plug weld a stud...
            That gave me an idea. Drill a hole big enough for the square bit on the carriage bolt, and then the round head will keep it straight for you while you pull on it and weld it from the threaded side, using the gaps for your penetration bevel, leaving less weld reinforcement above the plane of the steel sheet. Needs a hole drilled but might be easier than trying to hold a stud straight while welding around it.

            If plug welding the stud through a hole, you could keep the stud straight the same way by using a nut against the side you aren't welding from.

            Also mentioned in the OP was not having a nut on that back side. Is this for access to said nut? Could the nut be welded to the backside of a hole through the sheet?
            Last edited by MAC702; 12-01-2018, 12:41 PM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
              ,what size are your carriage bolts, how long and how many holes?
              Image result for serrated bolt head
              I am going to build some chicken brooders, and they will be stacked and for our needs there will be a bank of 3 wide and 5 units high, which translates into a frame that is about 3 feet wide and 8 foot long,

              and plan on using angle iron, as a frame, mostly 1 1/4" and 1", now welding it up is not really a problem, but if this idea ever needed to be moved, bolting together with 1/2" carriage bolts,
              could be a nice Idea,

              the ida I have is to build this skelitized frame, and then make removable panels on the openings, and sliding trays for the litter trays and the floors of the units, so the litter tray of the top unit is the top of the next lower unit, some of the covers would be made to incorporate feeders and ventilation vents, all removable with (most like barrel bolts in to the framework, that would hold the panels in the frame,

              but the side of the frame where where the panels go nuts or heads would be a Pain, and yes the first unit will most likely be welded solid, but I know we may build two more at lest, depending on the expansion of the "business" we going to try,

              and considered bolting this frame work together, so if one wanted to ship the unit it would be a smaller package,

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              • #8
                Also, don't forget that you don't need a square hole to relieve for the carriage bolt unless you need it to keep the carriage bolt from turning. Sometimes, you can easily hold the threads above the nut you are putting on. Sometimes you have to do that anyway just to keep the carriage bolt in the hole. So you're back to just drilling a round hole big enough for the square shank to recess into.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Farmerboy View Post
                  this is for 1/8 inch steel, I am working on an idea and having a nut or head of a bolt on one side would not work,

                  yes I know there are broaches, that one can use a press on and push the broach through a pre drilled hole,

                  that is slow, and I do not have a (iron worker), is there some type of punch that one could place in a pre drilled hole, and hitting with a 2 lb sledge hammer or similar, punching the corners out, I know there would have to be a die under the punch, and some way to line up the die and punch, or with some type of simple press?

                  is this type of tool made,

                  or something else made that is affordable,
                  Greenlee maks aquare die sets for ten guage that they sell individually. They are not cheap, but if you intend to make a business.... You could fab your own press out of spare hydraulics you have around.

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