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  • saw choice?

    Right now what I have is an abrasive wheel chop saw. I've had it for years and have gotten by with it ok.

    Never have been able to get a truly square cut with it but have trued them up with a grinder.

    I've thought about a dry cut chop saw but would this be a better option? http://www.trick-tools.com/Femi_782X...P53hoC2b7w_wcB

    It seems to be a very high quality piece of equipment. Plus it would take up much less space in my shop area then a big band saw. I like the fact that it can be raised vertical and a nice table fixed to it.

    I'm looking for advice from some experienced fabricators, I'm just a hobbiest.

  • #2
    Any saw can flex and screw up the cut either due to type, quality of pushing it too hard. That saw may work, but it can still flex a bit. It would be slower and you'd still be in the same boat. In my shop, there is no substitute for the dry saw. Fast and efficient.
    Don


    Go Spurs Go!!!!!!

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    • #3
      That saw will work but I wouldn't expect it to be more accurate than a chop saw. It looks like a Porta-Band with a swivel base and the cut capacity is the same. The table for vertical cutting is another $134 so you're north of $600 when you're done. That looks like too much $$$ for what it is IMO. For accuracy an Ellis or an old Kalamazoo in good shape would run rings around it but they are larger and the Ellis is more money.

      My chop saw isn't the most accurate but like you are doing, 30 seconds with an angle grinder gets it exact and without it the gap usually is so minor that I can fill it with whatever process I'm using. My Porta-Band knock-off with a mitre clamp is off by about what the chop saw is. The only advantage to the band saw is it isn't messy like the chop saw.

      Edit: If you go for a dry cut saw, get a good name brand with a large diameter blade. I have an Evolution Rage 4 and it is, ahem, quite the disappointment. In like-new condition I thought I couldn't go wrong for $60 but....I was wrong.
      Last edited by canoecruiser; 12-19-2016, 01:37 PM.
      CanoeCruiser
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      • #4
        I wonder what brand saw and blades you guys are running that complain about poor or out-of-square cuts with a chop saw. My 10-year old DeWalt cuts perfectly. It has a base and clamp far better than cheap saws, and I also use top-of-the-line thin Sait blades that slice through quickly, and I don't exceed the natural speed of the cut. Thin blades and proper feed rates also keep the saw from drawing excessive amperage.

        And yes, a carbide saw is great, and does even better cuts on the material it can do. But while it makes superior cuts in certain materials, the chop saw can cuts things it can't. Eventually, get both. Have a chop saw first unless you will only cut things easily done with a carbide saw. It also doesn't bother me to run a DeWalt MultiCutter inside (with hearing protection, of course) whereas I hate doing that with the chop saw.
        Last edited by MAC702; 12-19-2016, 03:09 PM.

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        • #5
          My take

          WAY 2 MUCH $$$$$$

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
            I wonder what brand saw and blades you guys are running that complain about poor or out-of-square cuts with a chop saw. My 10-year old DeWalt cuts perfectly. It has a base and clamp far better than cheap saws, and I also use top-of-the-line thin Sait blades that slice through quickly, and I don't exceed the natural speed of the cut. Thin blades and proper feed rates also keep the saw from drawing excessive amperage.

            And yes, a carbide saw is great, and does even better cuts on the material it can do. But while it makes superior cuts in certain materials, the chop saw can cuts things it can't. Eventually, get both. Have a chop saw first unless you will only cut things easily done with a carbide saw. It also doesn't bother me to run a DeWalt MultiCutter inside (with hearing protection, of course) whereas I hate doing that with the chop saw.

            Mac, most of the time from my experience with people and chop saws is they bear down and try to horse them too much. Blades flex when that happens. Also, cheap blades flex with little pressure. Thick blades add to the misery as well.

            I do agree with ya...both have their place....and along with a large bandsaw. I have and use all 3, though the chopper gets the least use of the lot.
            Don


            Go Spurs Go!!!!!!

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            • #7
              I have old "Craftsman Professional" horizontal band saw, .. Yes it is slow, and yes once tweaked it cuts true, paid $20 for silly thing and invested about 50 for parts, previous owner did not realize that the saw cuts on left side where most cut on right and you have to flip blade inside out... That being said, I if want real accuracy on first cut yes the band saw... If I just need something cut then chop is faster and IF I do not crowded it its cuts pretty true... Have cut may a piece of steel with Porter Cable "PortaBand" when I was in work world (and loved the saw) and yes hand held band saws are good but only if user is astute as to how to use saw...

              Not mine, but same model as mine...



              Dale
              Last edited by Dale M.; 12-19-2016, 03:53 PM.
              Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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              • #8
                I don't intend to get rid of my old Craftsman chop saw at all. I want something that can make miter cuts better and one thing that dry cut saws can't do is what a band saw when vertical can do. As far as brands go I find the you tube channels especially chucke2009 to be the wrong place for reviews, they seem to think free makes the equipment great, even Harbor Fright junk.

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                • #9
                  Odis, amen, brother.

                  And ChuckeCheese went to the dark side a few years back. Internet money, I suspect. Shame.
                  --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                  Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                  -------------------------
                  DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
                  Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

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                  • #10
                    Look so good.Did anyone test it?

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                    • #11
                      A Makita chop saw with the cast base is probably the best "portable" and reasonably priced saw I have seen. We have a 12" Makita carbide (dry cut) saw at work. A little better accuracy on the cuts, far less dust, but just as noisy. The carbide blades are pricey.
                      The little band saws still have a lot of twist in the blade so you aren't going to get a perfect cut. Much quieter, though.
                      fence and gate shop worker
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                      • #12
                        Dead nuts accuracy with this type saw. I put it on casters to roll it around the shop easily:
                        Attached Files
                        Thanks for reading/listening.

                        Antique Hobart Engine Drive Lover X5

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