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does cutting rusted metals speed tool wear

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  • does cutting rusted metals speed tool wear

    and if so is there an appreciable difference. anything from lathes, milling, hack saws, drill bits etc.

  • #2
    I would say not really as most times it is only a thin layer, and fairly loose. Speed, and feed rate and miss sharpened items will do more harm. If it concerns you hit it with a flap wheel type or just some aluminum oxide sandpaper.
    glen, been there, done that and probably broke it!If you aren't on the edge. You'r taking up to much room

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    • #3
      i started wondering about this topic years ago via knife sharpening. some people like oil, some water and others nothing on the stone. some say the slurry in water and oil actually help to sharpen the tool though i cannot see how that could happen and actually prefer a stone kept very clean with water. in a more controlled operation i could theoretically see how it might actually be used to sharpen.

      everyone that ive talked with so far thinks rusted wouldnt matter. i had one person say that it might in the bandsaw style of cutting.

      i was planning to knock off as much rust as i could before cutting it, it just takes too much time with stones or flap wheels.

      to me it is exceptionally counterintuitive that rust isnt a problem to the tools.

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      • #4
        Rust is the natural state, or oxide form of iron and as such, should not be as hard as the base steel. I would be concerned with rust clogging the pores of a sanding or grinding disc and shortening it's useful life, but I don't think it would have much effect on lathe cutters or toothed blades.
        Blacksmith
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        • #5
          Originally posted by mikecwik View Post
          i started wondering about this topic years ago via knife sharpening. some people like oil, some water and others nothing on the stone. some say the slurry in water and oil actually help to sharpen the tool though i cannot see how that could happen and actually prefer a stone kept very clean with water...
          A sharpening stone's microscopic rough surface (which looks like a sponge) 'cuts' the steel. As it cuts it wears off, which reveals a fresh layer of sharp edges. Sharpening without lubrication (be it water or oil) clogs the pores. The more you smooth out the microscopic rough surface, the less effective it will be in cutting your steel.

          The slurry helps sharpen the tool in the sense that it keeps the stone from clogging.

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          • #6
            i read an article from dormer tools that said when climb milling scale will reduce cutter life.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mikecwik View Post
              i read an article from dormer tools that said when climb milling scale will reduce cutter life.
              Well rust is a broad topic. On what alloy? How thick? etc. etc. Also what cutting tool?
              But Yes, in climbing the edges cut tru the rust into the base metal. In conventional
              the edges cut from the base metal up thru the rust.
              SO, in essence that would be a true general statement.
              vg
              sigpicViceGrip
              Negative people have a problem for every solution

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