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  • Bright and Shiny

    I have never tried to polish up a piece of steel. Yes I have smoothed with my hand grinder with abrasive wheel. I have even hit stuff with a sander and 200-grit paper.

    What is the process of making something shiny? What keeps it shiny after you are finished?

    What do I need to invest in and how much is this going to cost me?

    Thanks,
    Robert

    Snap-on (Century) 110 Mig
    Ridgid Chop Saw
    Makita 4" Grinder
    Quite a collection of scrap

    Functional Stuff is painted, my art rusts.

    The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes. - Winston Chruchill

  • #2
    It all depends on how much polishing you're going to do, and what types of metal you're going to be polishing. That said, do a Google search for Caswell Inc. The first hit is the best site I have found for any and all polishing, plating, etching supplies you need. As far as price, I just wanted to polish one standard 6 pound fire axe when I was in fire school, ended up spending about 100 bucks, but I have a LOT of stuff left over. Now that you've heard my horror story, if it's just something you want to do yourself, go ahead and make the purchase, but if it's something you'd just like to have polished up and don't care who does it, send me a PM, I might be able to help you.
    Contact me for any metal polishing needs you may have, my avatar is a pic of a standard, painted fire axe that I ground, sanded polished and buffed to a mirror finish.

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    • #3
      Just keep polishing with progressively finer abrasives - 320, 400, 600, 800, etc. You can even get abrasive sheets up to 12,000 grit. Then there are various loose abrasive/polishing compounds. See http://www.silcom.com/~css/ab1.htm for some various stuff. I've been wanting to try that Micro-Mesh paper.

      The idea is to progressively remove scratches left by the previous abrasive. Eventually, you can buff the surface. You might find this site about sword polishing interesting: http://www.scnf.org/polish.html The apprenticeships are from 5 to 10 years!

      Keeping steel from rusting is another matter...
      --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

      Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
      -------------------------

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      • #4
        Clear coat steel

        All you need is a can of clear coat paint. Sometimes you can even use a clear Lacquer on the bare metal to keep it from rusting. It also gives a real nice finish. You can also wet sand depending on how much time you want to put into it. I have done this on valve covers before. Forget chrome just polish the steel up and clear coat. It looks sweet! Good luck!

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        • #5
          Flap Wheels

          I have seen flap wheels. The only things I have tried on my hand grinder are the abrasive stones, cutoff wheels (once, scared the crud out of myself.) and a wire cup.

          Pros and cons?

          Also how many grinders should I have? I have a 9 inch with 40-grit paper been thinking about a big stone. I also have a 4-inch with the 1/4 inch thick disk. If I were to get another 4, 4 1/2, 5 grinder what should I load it with for most tasks?

          I do deal with a lot of rust; I was thinking of getting one just to hold the wire cup but am intrigued by the flap disks.
          Robert

          Snap-on (Century) 110 Mig
          Ridgid Chop Saw
          Makita 4" Grinder
          Quite a collection of scrap

          Functional Stuff is painted, my art rusts.

          The greatest lesson in life is to know that even fools are right sometimes. - Winston Chruchill

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