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  • Wz-222

    I was looking for information on a hobart "build your own" welder from the 1950's. The tag says it is a WZ-222. Output is 200 amps. I have it connected to a Wisconsin THD and it welds great. Keith from Hobart was able to give the manufactured date of 1954 but has no other info. See attached picture.

    Colin

  • #2
    Colin...I don't think I'm the only one thinking you went cheap on the pictures. How about a few more including a money shot of the front. I'm also going to say thanks, the extra effort is appreciated.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Colin View Post
      I was looking for information on a hobart "build your own" welder from the 1950's. The tag says it is a WZ-222. Output is 200 amps. I have it connected to a Wisconsin THD and it welds great. Keith from Hobart was able to give the manufactured date of 1954 but has no other info. See attached picture.

      Colin
      Looks like a "Simplified" that someone put together, and there were many, from the mid-30's to the 60's. Here's an ad from Popular Mechanix, May, 1950:

      Click image for larger version

Name:	Hobart Simplified Ad - 1950 .png
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ID:	703056

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      • #4
        Thanks for the responses. You are right "Older Guy" I was cheap with the pictures. This is my first post. I did put these units together myself. Engine needed thorough cleaning, new wires, coil, switches, guages, etc. Its a 1962 Wisconsin THD with 6Volt autolite generator/ distributor, no magneto, positive ground. This was apparently an upgrade you had to get from the factory. I used a fuel tank and rear shroud from a 1943 VE4 that I have. The generator / welder component was packet with mouse nest. Required thorough cleaning. Was not working when reassembled. Opened back up and discovered a small broken wire. Spliced and tried again. No spark or any sign of life. Kept playing with the rpm's and scratching a rod, multiple settings. After about 15 minutes got a tiny spark. This lasted for a couple minutes on and off and then she suddenly roared backed to life. See additional photos.

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        • #5
          Sorry. See pics

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          • #6
            Colin, it must be a Ford because that's a job well done! Lovely! I tip my hat to you sir. And Northweldor,I'm giving you a nod for that ad.

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            • #7
              Thanks Older Guy. Nothing beats "Made in the USA"!
              l would like to see how much of this offshore junk is still around in 50 years.

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              • #8
                Doing the math...2018 less 50... 1968. All kinds of thing last the test of time, it's guys looking after what they spent the hard earned buck on that kind of decides things I think?

                https://tampa.craigslist.org/hil/tls...764275092.html

                It used to be things were rare, or rarely seen. This stuff is out there but technology has kicked the back off it's present day value. Not interest, but value.

                You have a nice piece of equipment. I'm sure it'll last the next 50 years. If I'm wrong about that, I doubt I'll be around in 20 to hear you curse my name for thinking it would.

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                • #9
                  If a generator is not used for a very long time, it can lose its magnetic field (excitation); then it cannot induce a voltage when the windings (conductors) pass through the field as it rotates. There is no residual magnetism so you must "flash" the field.

                  "Flashing" the field involves connection of an electric drill motor to the electric receptacle, run the generator, set drill to forward rotation, pull drill trigger switch to close switch contacts. Wear a leather glove, grab the drill chuck and rotate in reverse direction. The drill motor becomes a little generator if rotated in reverse direction. It generates a small voltage which travels through the switch and cord; creating field excitation. When the field is flashed, a voltage is induced in the conductors; generating electric power. Hopefully, after flashing the field, residual magnetism will remain in the field after the machine is shut down.

                  I'm pretty sure you need to use a drill motor which has brushes as a brushless drill motor probably won't generate a voltage across the cord plug's blades when the chuck is rotated in reverse.

                  Originally posted by Colin View Post
                  Kept playing with the rpm's and scratching a rod, multiple settings. After about 15 minutes got a tiny spark. This lasted for a couple minutes on and off and then she suddenly roared backed to life. See additional photos.
                   

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