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  • #16
    I'm not... But I was however offering an opinion on what was presented.
    While it's easy enough to say pass or fail, that's like saying ugly or pretty? What's the criteria for judging that? Without specific criteria, how high or low the bar is set, it's in the eye of the beholder and fitness for purpose.

    I don't know Sberry from Adam but with 11623 posts, I'm sure the adage of old dogs and new tricks fits maybe?
    That said, I have seen old pressure welders who while still capable of welding pipe, fail at using a Mig to weld a quarter panel on a car, braze a chunk of cast, or even know how to gas weld, or cut with a torch. Never to old to learn in my books.
    Click image for larger version

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    HH135/mixed gas/.030 ER70S-6/ 1/8" 3 passes. It is what it is. Those two little beads on the bottom right were my efforts on fine tuning before I started laying metal in. One after another and by pass #3 it was getting hot. Not saying it's the prettiest, or the most consistent, but it got the job done and that's what matters.

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    • #17
      Those look good oldie. I don't get a chance to do this anymore and really struggle when I do. We pulled a portable out of the barn the other day and had my brother run some old rods on it while I tune it a little. I should have gotten some pics. He rarely does it but they were really good. Wouldn't take.much work and he could go anywhere.
      A while back I thought I might have to test. I figured I grab a few rods and impress myself in the booth. ****, I fooled with a dozen rods a day for.a week or 10.days before I was even close.
      http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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      • #18
        Thanks for thinking so. Always good to put into practice what I seemingly elude to knowing something about? When it comes to this welding, I'm the monkey doing an act for the organ. Music plays I dance. But like all old monkeys doing the dance, we don't move as fast, consistent, or always remember the step, but we do the show anyways and that's what counts. As I like to say, we do well for being old guys in a young mans game.

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        • #19
          I am humbled. I went to a job yesterday and had a problem. No one was there so it's not a deal but I do this about once a year and weld a replacement coupler on an underground pipe. I did one about a year ago, in a hole standing on my head with little clearance, poor view and was careful, did it in a pass in about 5 minutes. My helper was even impressed.
          . Yesterday, fit it up, was right up in front of me, didn't have it perfect but it was sooooow easy. The old welder was stumbly, I had a dirty hood, barely see the thing and burn a hole in it about 8 oclock. Bad to worse, hour later I am out of gas, ground my grinder cord in half-hour, still got to go back and finish a 10 minute weld.
          Done this hundred times, not once even a pinhole. Haven't done that in 35 years. My brain says no problem but I just don't weld regular enough anymore other than real simple stuff I forget to its not automatic at best.
          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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          • #20
            One of those days eh... I feel for ya. Happens to everyone. Things seem to either go good, just go, or go for crap. On the bright side, there's always tomorrow and that I'm sure will bring about better results.

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            • #21
              Ya, cleaned and fixed my hood, cleaned the carb on the machine, found a broken wire on it took hour to fix and went back and finished in a few minutes.
              I know better than to test for 5 minutes and assume it's ready to work. The machine has been in storage a while and start right up and run. After a little work the bugs show up.
              .
              . All this looks good to customers but would show up in critical tests. I should take a few minutes for a few days and stick my head and hand in the booth and burn a few rods, especially low hy. My brain says it's not a problem but doing it is a different matter. I weld some, every day or 2 but not much, rod at a time, little wire, all short, hand it off a lot of the time.
              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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              • #22
                When I was welding regular could really get the quality up when I wanted to. I was never really happy with it but the testing proved different. When Innershield was first emerging in Ironwork I was in Miami and Dave Black as I recall from AWS come down to the job where we were running full pen with back gouge and welding all day. They were fussing about the quality (should have got quotes for resume from those guys) but they come out several times to take looksee. They said the grain and the clarity was fabulous.
                . Was working for American Bridge at the time, had the offers to go anywhere but had other interests at the time.
                Innershield is like lo hy on roids, never got to stop in bad spot to change rods, no hot rod, hi current
                http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                • #23
                  I handed my brother a handful of rods while I tested some stuff on the welder. I don't know how long its been since he has done this. I should have cleaned it, in the hand it looks a lot better than in a pic but we didnt clean it. Click image for larger version

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                  http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                  • #24
                    You know what they say about pictures... never very flattering and the camera adds 10 lbs. The OP would be wise to study it, with an honest reflection on differences in appearance between this and his.

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                    • #25
                      It has been sitting around a couple weeks too. If I get a chance I will brush it. If he did this regular it looks like he could get pretty good at it. New rods and clean steel would help too, this just scrap.
                      http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                      • #26
                        Unlike old pizza, time doesn't do much to a weld as it passes by except allow it to cool. I'm going to guess that it was a 3/32" diameter E7018? And the cover pass was done in 6 rods, maybe 7. But that's just a guess.

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                        • #27
                          It was 1/8. I an not sure how many rods there were. It's got to be close to an inch wide. I was paying attn to the machine. I replaced some lead lugs, I might put a new stinger on as I have a couple. I was trying to make sure the lead connectors were working.
                          ideally is a pipe thaw job to load it some, higher current and can run it steady a while and find hot spots. I was going to walk out to the service truck and grab some 5/32.
                          . I have 4 engine drives and none of them gets used. I kept them around in case I went back in to the biz, keeping them would be cheaper than buying if I needed them.
                          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                          • #28
                            It was a close guess just the same. Missed it by that much...and if it had been mentioned earlier on about the 1" wide, I like to think I would have guessed the 1/8" rod size? So close. Looks like 6 or 7 rods just the same. Final answer. Good luck with that effort. Sounds like work and I've been good at avoiding that lately.

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