Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Poor Weld Joint Visibility

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Poor Weld Joint Visibility

    I originally posted this in the Office Section but should have posted it here in General Welding Questions:

    I am very much new to making welds. A friend let me use his Miller mig welder and auto-darkening helmet last Summer to weld my snowblower. My welds were inaccurate because I couldn't see the joint I was welding. The mig wire completely missed the metal joint I was trying to join. A lot of grinding was needed. It was fun trying...

    Fast forward to Christmas. I bought a new Hobart Handler 190 mig welder and ANTRA AH7-860 auto-darkening hood. This helmet has the largest viewing window available 3.86" x 3.50". Regardless, I still can't see the joint I'm trying to weld! I've got the lens set to #10 shade. When the arc occurs, it's difficult/impossible to see the joint. My work turns into a lot of sparking and spattering. Sometimes, even a blind squirrel finds a nut and I accomplish an ugly tack weld.

    The Hobart Handler came with 0.030" flux core wire. I plugged it into my 240 volt AC generator. All the paint is removed from my work piece. I started with #1 voltage tap and ~30 IPM wire speed on a very thin piece (~25 gauge) of sheet metal tubing.
    Antra™ AH7-860 Series welding helmet is featured with the smart chip controlled 4 sensor auto darkening lens, which is extremely fast responsive to electric arc from TIG, MIG, MMA or Plasma applications. The luxury jumbo viewing area 3.78X3.50" provides a much better vision of the whole welding process, which ensures a
    Last edited by Badbmwbrad; 12-30-2018, 07:23 PM.

  • #2
    Several things I have found... More light on the area to weld by focusing shop light (quartz) where weld will take place, or put headlamp on welding helmet to focus more light on joint....

    Clean joint to shiny bright and highlight line with BLACK marking pen (white works too)...

    https://www.forneyind.com/products/w...-marker-carded

    Add 1:00 or 2:00 or 2:5 diopter cheater lens behind the AD lens or wear reader cheaters if you are not using prescription glasses...




    Click image for larger version  Name:	WELDHEMETWITHLIGHT.jpg Views:	1 Size:	33.9 KB ID:	703082

    Not mine, but borrowed graphic from i-net for example...I personally have small LED flashlight taped to top of my helmet pending finding light I will be happy with...

    Might want to look at this link for help with your welding...

    http://weldingtipsandtricks.com

    On really thin sheet metal you don't run a bead, you do many,many.many tack welds till seam is solid... Do one every inch or so apart till seam is complete...

    Dale
    Last edited by Dale M.; 12-30-2018, 09:17 PM.
    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

    Comment


    • #3
      You know what they say about practice? We could all use more. More to your problem...not knowing a darn thing about you, you could be a blind squirrel and all the light in the world won't help? But...you could switch down to a #9 shade and I doubt you'll go blinder. I'm sure a bit more practice will help you follow a line, crack, slight shadow difference? It takes time.

      As far as running the bead goes...I just happened to be playing around today so these are pretty fresh. Doable. The little squiggle thing, that was the part that said, yea, still got some, now I'm warmed up. So I called it a day and went back in the house for Net Flix.

      But like I mentioned, do able.

      Comment


      • #4
        practice practice practice. i know absolutely nothing about those helmets but i do know size isn't everything. the biggest view area in the world isn't gonna do jack if it's still a s*** view. what are your lighting conditions? if you're working in a dim shop/garage where it's already hard enough to see without the helmet you're gonna have a hard time seeing the weld. maybe pick up a few cheaper work lights to put around the area. even a magnetic flashlight will do the trick depending how long you're gonna be out there. of course the condition of your eyes also factors in but my eyes are pretty **** bad and i still do alright

        in the end it still comes down to practice. i was all over the place starting out too. it helps to fit up scrap practice pieces in a way that it's hard not to go in a straight line

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for the advice and tips. The generator I use to power the welder gets me outside in the daylight; away from the house. I'm trying to open butt weld 1" tubing pieces (stacked vertically) together. I'll keep practicing

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Badbmwbrad View Post
            Thanks for the advice and tips. The generator I use to power the welder gets me outside in the daylight; away from the house. I'm trying to open butt weld 1" tubing pieces (stacked vertically) together. I'll keep practicing
            if you're outside in the sun it could actually be that you're not going dark enough. too bright of a work area can actually be worse then too dark especially if light is making it around the helmet

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks for some really good advice. I spent a lot of time at the web site linked below and also watched a related YouTube video on what a weld should NOT sound like. Amongst several other things that were wrong, the main problems were a poor ground and way too much stick-out. The poor ground caused intermittent arcing yet the wire kept feeding; resulting in a steadily increasing stick-out and wire dancing/arcing everywhere (except for in the metal joint).

              I stripped insulation off a stranded copper wire conductor and twisted it into a short wire rope to place between the ground clamp and work piece. Then I rested the edge of the brass torch gas cup against the work piece before triggering the arc.

              The second piece of advice below (series of tacks) should also have been followed (it wasn't) so you know that I burned right through my work piece! On the next attempt, the wire stubbed out and I didn't react fast enough to release the trigger; resulting in a bird nest at the wire feed drive. Argghh!

              Losing patience, I set aside the work piece; wanting to just make a metal puddle on a flat plate and practice the little swirling movements while welding in a straight line as shown on the YouTube videos. This exercise was done on a more forgiving (thicker) 14 gauge sheet metal stamping. Oh yeah, I ditched my Varilux glasses and put on some fixed-magnification reading glasses to improve the field of near-vision.

              Viola! With the torch held very close to the metal and having a good ground and thicker metal, the arc was sustained long enough to get myself oriented to see a puddle with respect to the workpiece. Ran a few weld beads and practiced making turns to the sound of bacon frying!

              Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
              Might want to look at this link for help with your welding...
              http://weldingtipsandtricks.com

              On really thin sheet metal you don't run a bead, you do many,manye many tack welds till seam is solid... Do one every inch or so apart till seam is complete...
              Dale

              Comment


              • #8
                yep it's best to practice a lot on some nice thick pieces. don't worry about doing patterns and such yet tho. it's best to just run a straight bead(practice both pushing and pulling) before worrying about anything else. also worry about weld strength before making it look good. it's possible to make a great looking weld that's actually very weak

                stick out is probably the biggest mistake people make starting off. i know i did it too and i've watched every single person i've ever taught hold the thing like a foot away from the work piece then wonder why it won't work.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I'm attributing my improved vision during a most-recent welding session to eye micro-surgery. The ophthalmologist replaces the eye's natural lens with a clear silicon lens resulting in improved visual acuity, crystal clarity and brilliant colors.

                  With my welding helmet on and an arc weld in progress, there's no glare and I can see the joint and puddle at the same time.
                  Last edited by Badbmwbrad; 02-15-2019, 07:43 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    " I started with #1 voltage tap and ~30 IPM wire speed on a very thin piece (~25 gauge) of sheet metal tubing."....it is a lot easier to learn on thicker materials
                    "never argue with an idiot; he'll bring you down to his level, and win by experience"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great tips ,keep it up .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        With continued practice, I've learned to drag the the flux-core wire bead by angling the top of the torch toward the direction-of-travel. As a right-handed person, watching the weld puddle from the left side while traveling from right-to-left provides a better view of the weld joint and advancing puddle.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          One thing I’ve had problems with in the past is large gas nozzles on mig guns that can potentially restrict your travel of path vision.
                          For groove welds I prefer a tappored contact tip and nozzle. It allows so much better visibility for travel and allows me to get further into a groove with the gun. It makes a large difference.
                          If your using self shielded flux core wire, you don’t need the gas nozzle on your gun anyway. It’s just obstructing your view. If your using gas with your wire welding process, you do need the gas nozzle on the gun.
                          Lincoln Idealarc 250
                          Miller Bobcat 250
                          Thermal arc Hefty 2 feeder
                          Thermal Dynamics Cusmaster 52
                          Torchmate CNC Table

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by snoeproe View Post
                            One thing I’ve had problems with in the past is large gas nozzles on mig guns that can potentially restrict your travel of path vision.
                            For groove welds I prefer a tappored contact tip and nozzle. It allows so much better visibility for travel and allows me to get further into a groove with the gun. It makes a large difference.
                            If your using self shielded flux core wire, you don’t need the gas nozzle on your gun anyway. It’s just obstructing your view. If your using gas with your wire welding process, you do need the gas nozzle on the gun.
                            Hobart has a accessory nozzle with a reduced size tip specially for use with fluxcore wire.... And yes I have also discovered watching puddle from side of gun and not over top is better visibility on what the arc/puddle is actually doing (flowing)...

                            https://www.hobartwelders.com/consum...-nozzle-770487

                            Dale
                            "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X