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Exhaust system information for smoke?

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  • Exhaust system information for smoke?

    I am using a flux core welder to learn how to weld and as y'all know it produces a lot of smoke. In some of the videos I have seen there is a large suction pipe or hose above a welding table to collect the smoke and I am wondering if anyone here has any information on a machine like this. In warmer weather I would simply open the shop doors and set a fan up but right now it is in the 20 degree range in central Alabama so I would like to learn about another way to exhaust the smoke. Thanks for any information you may have.

  • #2
    It's a welding fume collection/ventilation system. There are many models and types of these available.
    Lincoln Idealarc 250
    Miller Bobcat 250
    Thermal arc Hefty 2 feeder
    Thermal Dynamics Cusmaster 52
    Torchmate CNC Table

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    • #3
      Originally posted by snoeproe View Post
      It's a welding fume collection/ventilation system. There are many models and types of these available.
      And, there have been many fires caused by people trying to substitute a cheap DUST control system. It has to be fire ressitant material. I have used a fan and rigid and flexible dryer venting, but nowhere near performance of a good mfgd. system.
      Last edited by Northweldor; 12-07-2018, 09:34 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by bulldog7 View Post
        I am using a flux core welder to learn how to weld and as y'all know it produces a lot of smoke. In some of the videos I have seen there is a large suction pipe or hose above a welding table to collect the smoke and I am wondering if anyone here has any information on a machine like this. In warmer weather I would simply open the shop doors and set a fan up but right now it is in the 20 degree range in central Alabama so I would like to learn about another way to exhaust the smoke. Thanks for any information you may have.
        20 degree range...stuff hasn't started to freeze in that range has it? I'm going to give you some hard tough love here.
        A c
        racked door or window lets air in, a
        fan exhausts air out. Smoke rises. Keep you head back. Nature does the rest. Called air flow. Stop welding, turn the fan off, close the door. Shop warms up. Leave a crack to supply as much gets sucked out and good to go. Dress for the breeze if you want to move lots of air quickly.

        You add a tube to the fan, lots of info and ideas out there. Recirculation extraction can be made or purchased. Did I mention hot air rises? Suck it up, filter it and return it. Pay attention to filtration. It can be costly...How you capture it to remove it is endless if that's the goal rather then just exhaust.

        Todays Edmonton weather forecast was a balmy 15 degrees F, -8 Celsius . That's warm.
        Dress in layers. Larger boots extra socks. Sweater and a hoodie under a jacket. Long Johns and sweats under coveralls. You haven't a reason to be complaining about not cracking a door, but I'm sure it feels cold just the same?
        As a matter of course, you wearing a respirator?

        http://www.tthydroponic.com/index.ph...product_id=168

        While I'm sure your not as concerned about odor, look at can fans as well. Clean that air running threw that sort of thing?
        Oh...you could for the price of a process upgrade, depending on what you weld, switch to a solid wire cheaper then the price of some exhaust systems. Reduce the plume of fume by about 1/2 to 2/3 maybe? Or you good dress a bit warmer and open the door? But as a heads up, local recirculation extraction is not the worst place to spend a buck on. Just remember they do require maintenance, and filters aren't cheap.

        https://www.kemper.eu/en/worth-knowi...d-legistlation

        https://lr.vdma.org/documents/105915...0-bf9a1125e402

        While I don't have a recommendation on what to buy, I'm not adverse to suggesting some reading before you do.

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        • #5
          I use a lot of flux core with very little smoke. I always use Hobart fluxcore wire which helps. The one time I had a lot of smoke, minimal results was whenI bought a new welder, put the wire in and fired it up. It was crazy smoke, the polarity was positive instead of negative. Made the switch and never had another issue.

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          • #6
            RattleCan41 makes a good point. Adding to it, what flux core wire are you using? As well, long arc lengths yield greater fume generation then a shorter arc length. Like over spray when painting, if your making the cloud, there are ways to minimize it.

            https://madesafe.ca/wp-content/uploa...weld-s-rpt.pdf

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