Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Controlling spatter

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Don't have welding table so don't have spatter problem except on the "work"... Usually scrape with putty knife removes then, or quick hit with flap disk as I'm cleaning up project if they are really suborn...... And all ever wanted to know is if the S.G. product works... Seem's to be really good idea of it water rinses and leaves no oily residue behind...

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Dale M. View Post
      Don't have welding table so don't have spatter problem except on the "work"... Usually scrape with putty knife removes then, or quick hit with flap disk as I'm cleaning up project if they are really suborn...... And all ever wanted to know is if the S.G. product works... Seem's to be really good idea of it water rinses and leaves no oily residue behind...

      Dale
      I like that I can mist everything with SG, even the work piece, and the weld isn't adversely affected

      Comment


      • #18
        https://www.thefabricator.com/articl...metal-porosity
        #13
        Nothing good comes from excess...so they say. But I can think of a few examples where excess while not good or beneficial, didn't do any harm either?
        I'm not sure what SG is or all about, but if you ask me, (D) was the correct answer. Back in the old days they used to protect something below from splatter with thin sheets of tin plate, maybe taping threads, Asbestos blankets. Dampened rags? But I get it.
        Great ***** of fire. Anti splatter spray. Something of a sizzle.

        https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...77027315002899
        Highlights

        The degree to which spatter clasts fuse together is correlated with the cooling rate of a spatter deposit.
        Higher accumulation rates of spatter results in more fusing between clasts.
        The duration of the spatter rampart-building phase of an eruption can be estimated by examining the degree of fusing between clasts.
        Goes right up there with to much of a good thing doesn't it?

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by bulldog7 View Post
          I have a flux core welder and when I weld spatter collects on the table. How is the best way to control this? I have seen some people say to use anti spatter spray on the table before welding and wondering does this help. I don't like a rough surface to work on. Thank you for your advice.
          Bulldog7

          After all of the above, the parameters you are using,( voltage, wfs ctwd,and travel speed) and gas type and coverage, are the most important factors in controlling spatter, and if you are really having a problem, i would look there first. If your settings are optimal, you should have little need for anti spatter
          compounds.

          Also, you might check your wire to make sure that you are using manufacturers specs. and the right product, since there is actually a type of FC wire with explosive in the flux, designed to blow off plating,and create spatter!

          Best wishes on a cleaner table!

          Comment


          • #20
            I've seen no evidence of porosity when using Simple Green anti-spatter, but then I don't over do it.....all I do is spray a very fine mist.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Rangerhgm View Post
              I've seen no evidence of porosity when using Simple Green anti-spatter, but then I don't over do it.....all I do is spray a very fine mist.
              And, let it dry!

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Northweldor View Post

                And, let it dry!
                I haven't let it dry, I weld immediately after I spray

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Rangerhgm View Post

                  I haven't let it dry, I weld immediately after I spray
                  You should, since otherwise, you are introducing extra water (Hydrogen!) into your weld.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Northweldor View Post

                    You should, since otherwise, you are introducing extra water (Hydrogen!) into your weld.
                    Ah.....good point.....never thought of that

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X