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  • Controlling spatter

    I have a flux core welder and when I weld spatter collects on the table. How is the best way to control this? I have seen some people say to use anti spatter spray on the table before welding and wondering does this help. I don't like a rough surface to work on. Thank you for your advice.

  • #2
    I use this. I put some in a small spray bottle and spray my nozzle/tip, work piece and table. I'm using straight Co2 and what few beads of spatter I get just brush off with my glove. At 14.79/gal this will last a long time.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Simple-Gree...n+anti+spatter
    Gregg
    Handler 210MVP
    Stickmate 210i

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    • #3
      Pam or other cooking spray is a popular choice, too, and it comes in flavors!

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      • #4
        Lol...Funny part is, that's spot on for advice. I'm glad it wasn't me mentioning it. I tend to say enough that raises eyebrows.

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        • #5
          I always use PAM on work surface (when needed) and nozzle but a day or two ago this product came up on a tractor forum I visit, just like above post by "Rangerhgm"....

          https://simplegreen.com/industrial/p.../anti-spatter/

          No experience with product and never seen it in hardware/ranch or welding supply stores, but my world is pretty small...

          Dale
          Last edited by Dale M.; 11-28-2018, 06:55 PM.
          "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bulldog7 View Post
            I have a flux core welder and when I weld spatter collects on the table. How is the best way to control this? I have seen some people say to use anti spatter spray on the table before welding and wondering does this help. I don't like a rough surface to work on. Thank you for your advice.
            Take an egg in your hand and squish it against a wall. Take another and throw it against the wall. Splatter. You've been given great advice to ease removal from the table what accumulates.
            It could be what's needed is a splatter reduction strategies? Changes to wfs, voltage, arc length? Maybe even wire size or type? It's not what you asked but it could be what you need?

            Open the can of worms and the next step is to decide what to do with them? Be brave. Post a picture of the table, maybe a weld? How bad is the problem? If this was a painting forum, your question would be about dealing with over spray, drips and runs and how to remove them from the floor? In which case, your question would be what material covers best?

            The guy says, I eat to much. Do you tape his mouth or cut off his hands? It might be easier to just remove the food?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post

              Take an egg in your hand and squish it against a wall. Take another and throw it against the wall. Splatter. You've been given great advice to ease removal from the table what accumulates.
              It could be what's needed is a splatter reduction strategies? Changes to wfs, voltage, arc length? Maybe even wire size or type? It's not what you asked but it could be what you need?

              Open the can of worms and the next step is to decide what to do with them? Be brave. Post a picture of the table, maybe a weld? How bad is the problem? If this was a painting forum, your question would be about dealing with over spray, drips and runs and how to remove them from the floor? In which case, your question would be what material covers best?

              The guy says, I eat to much. Do you tape his mouth or cut off his hands? It might be easier to just remove the food?
              good analogies.... I never get my machine dialed in to get no spatter, but I can get it to where I get very little. Getting things dialed in correctly certainly helps with obtaining better welds as well as reducing spatter.
              Gregg
              Handler 210MVP
              Stickmate 210i

              Comment


              • #8
                You won't get away from the splatter. Your goal as I mentioned is reduction. Let me ask you, and anyone paying attention, a question.

                Before I do, I was told the taxonomy of a multiple choice question, will have 4 answers. Two will be wrong, as distractors. One will be close enough to being right. But since there can be only be one right one answer, remember close doesn't count.

                No harm no foul, no wrong answers just some better then others.

                Why does splatter stick to the table?
                A) Welding with high voltages.
                B) welding with high amperages.
                C) Welding too close to the surface
                D) The splatter droplet remains hot enough to form a metallic bond.

                Here's another one for you. Clean a window. Two reasons. One, to see better. Two, because when you squeeze the handle on the Windex, it's going to spray out in a droplet pattern. To close it runs down the glass, to far and the droplets fall before reaching the glass. Just right, you found the sweet spot of good coverage and the droplet doesn't run or fall but sticks.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
                  You won't get away from the splatter. Your goal as I mentioned is reduction. Let me ask you, and anyone paying attention, a question.

                  Before I do, I was told the taxonomy of a multiple choice question, will have 4 answers. Two will be wrong, as distractors. One will be close enough to being right. But since there can be only be one right one answer, remember close doesn't count.

                  No harm no foul, no wrong answers just some better then others.

                  Why does splatter stick to the table?
                  A) Welding with high voltages.
                  B) welding with high amperages.
                  C) Welding too close to the surface
                  D) The splatter droplet remains hot enough to form a metallic bond.

                  Here's another one for you. Clean a window. Two reasons. One, to see better. Two, because when you squeeze the handle on the Windex, it's going to spray out in a droplet pattern. To close it runs down the glass, to far and the droplets fall before reaching the glass. Just right, you found the sweet spot of good coverage and the droplet doesn't run or fall but sticks.
                  I find the analogies fairly irrelevant. If you really want to reduce spatter , and have covered the text-book factors, you can easily reduce spatter by raising your weldment or, using cooking oil, or SimpleGreen, or switching to solid wire, and gas

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                  • #10
                    Love my almost splatter free solid wire and shield gas...

                    Dale
                    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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                    • #11
                      Did you ever take a class, only to find out your given information, then the guy at the front of the class starts reading it to you. Doesn't explain it. Make it digestible. Just reads it to you? Text book.

                      Did you ever take a class, given information, then had an engaging conversation? Expanding topics of interest, high lighting commonalities, propelling excitement with understanding? Educational entertainment.

                      Both do the same job. Industry wants people who can weld, what they need is people who understand the relevance to my analogies. Just switching to solid wire with a gas shielding hasn't resolved the splatter, although typical it is reduced to smaller beads. Why comparing CO2 to C-25 mix yields more rather then less. For those wondering...droplet size. Larger pebbles thrown in the pond kind of thing. Ha! Look at me go, I squeaked in another.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
                        Did you ever take a class, only to find out your given information, then the guy at the front of the class starts reading it to you. Doesn't explain it. Make it digestible. Just reads it to you? Text book.

                        Did you ever take a class, given information, then had an engaging conversation? Expanding topics of interest, high lighting commonalities, propelling excitement with understanding? Educational entertainment.

                        Both do the same job. Industry wants people who can weld, what they need is people who understand the relevance to my analogies. Just switching to solid wire with a gas shielding hasn't resolved the splatter, although typical it is reduced to smaller beads. Why comparing CO2 to C-25 mix yields more rather then less. For those wondering...droplet size. Larger pebbles thrown in the pond kind of thing. Ha! Look at me go, I squeaked in another.
                        Wow! How did we ever get along without you!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Northweldor View Post

                          Wow! How did we ever get along without you!
                          Let me guess, you like salt so you sprinkle it on everything?
                          Might I suggest you don't have to troll my comments nor respond to them. You could just spend a bit more effort in typing out a rebuttal? A more lengthy or learned response does assist the reader doesn't it?
                          A little salt enhances flavor, to much ruins the dish. Ponder that analogy.

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                          • #14
                            i just hit my table with a flap disc every so often. the little splatter pebbles usually come off easy enough but there's always the odd one that needs a bit more encouragement

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Andy578 View Post
                              i just hit my table with a flap disc every so often. the little splatter pebbles usually come off easy enough but there's always the odd one that needs a bit more encouragement
                              I do the same, if the chipping hammer doesn't take them off easily.

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