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  • Welding rod ovens

    Is it safe to leave a rod oven on all the time? I always have rods inside

  • #2
    Originally posted by Wildwelder96 View Post
    Is it safe to leave a rod oven on all the time? I always have rods inside
    Yes, since they are made for continuous duty.

    Comment


    • #3
      Your supposed to. 350F is a good number. Other wise you should re-bake them. While I'm sure you'll find lots on the subject, I remember when a rod oven was an old fridge and a 60 watt bulb. Lol, the good old days...?
      But those days are gone.

      Think of it this way, leave a bag of cement out and eventually the air will harden it. Unplug the hot box and with heating and cooling come condensation. Now, with the knowledge this is in reference to lime/basic
      calcium fluoride (CaF
      2
      )
      flux coatings, think of wet drywall board? Slow burn and lots of smoking. That's how you introduce hydrogen. Wet vapor, lol. Sure, there's more science with it but asked and answered.

      Having said all of that...here's a word, hydroscopic. Picks up moisture. How much how fast depends on conditions. Heck, you didn't hear it from me but depending on what your welding, not a big concern either. But for best results...oven stays on.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
        Your supposed to. 350F is a good number. Other wise you should re-bake them. While I'm sure you'll find lots on the subject, I remember when a rod oven was an old fridge and a 60 watt bulb. Lol, the good old days...?
        But those days are gone.

        Think of it this way, leave a bag of cement out and eventually the air will harden it. Unplug the hot box and with heating and cooling come condensation. Now, with the knowledge this is in reference to lime/basic
        calcium fluoride (CaF
        2
        )
        flux coatings, think of wet drywall board? Slow burn and lots of smoking. That's how you introduce hydrogen. Wet vapor, lol. Sure, there's more science with it but asked and answered.

        Having said all of that...here's a word, hydroscopic. Picks up moisture. How much how fast depends on conditions. Heck, you didn't hear it from me but depending on what your welding, not a big concern either. But for best results...oven stays on.
        Why did you say all? Who asked?

        Comment


        • #5
          No one asked, I just shared.

          Climbing off the high horse of being an expert, does it hurt to offer more then just a direct voice of authority with a "
          Yes, since they are made for continuous duty.
          "

          If your wondering why? It was because I made assumptions.

          I assumed... here is a guy who got a rod oven because someone said " those electrodes must be stored in an oven?"

          I assumed
          that if an individual asked the question should his rod oven be left on continuously, that maybe he needed further explanation after being sold on the fact he needed a rod oven? Not to say my response was all encompassing, it wasn't. I should have asked what rods are you storing in the oven? But it didn't hurt me to provide the additional commentary.

          Call me the voice of reason but the reality is, for simple mild steel fabrications, void of high carbon or thick quenching materials, the average Joe doesn't need to worry himself to such an extent. Sealed containment in small quantities, a fridge with a burning bulb, no harm no foul in most instances. Greater factors come into play regarding weld quality, what's acceptable and what isn't? As they say, fit for purpose.

          So yea, I added a bit that no one asked for, so what?




          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by oldguyfrom56 View Post
            No one asked, I just shared.

            Climbing off the high horse of being an expert, does it hurt to offer more then just a direct voice of authority with a "
            Yes, since they are made for continuous duty.
            "

            If your wondering why? It was because I made assumptions.

            I assumed... here is a guy who got a rod oven because someone said " those electrodes must be stored in an oven?"

            I assumed
            that if an individual asked the question should his rod oven be left on continuously, that maybe he needed further explanation after being sold on the fact he needed a rod oven? Not to say my response was all encompassing, it wasn't. I should have asked what rods are you storing in the oven? But it didn't hurt me to provide the additional commentary.

            Call me the voice of reason but the reality is, for simple mild steel fabrications, void of high carbon or thick quenching materials, the average Joe doesn't need to worry himself to such an extent. Sealed containment in small quantities, a fridge with a burning bulb, no harm no foul in most instances. Greater factors come into play regarding weld quality, what's acceptable and what isn't? As they say, fit for purpose.

            So yea, I added a bit that no one asked for, so what?



            I will never call you the voice of reason.

            Comment


            • #7
              Rods that require rod ovens are supposed to be in them, with the oven on, from the time they are taken out of the sealed package until just before use.

              Rods that are required to be low-hydrogen for a coded weld are not supposed to just be heated before use. There is a specific procedure for a one-time (I think) redrying of such rods if storage was not done properly.

              So, yes, keep your rod oven on.

              Comment


              • #8
                You know what astounds me...? At one time they joined metal with bare electrodes. Crazy. Now they have an industry of oven makers? Who seen that coming?
                I'm thinking average Joe and the high cost of electrical bills while you guys are thinking big bad wolf and the construction codes?

                Let me ask you...who do you think asks that question? I'm thinking someone who needs to know a little more? Average Joe.

                Don't take my word for it average Joe people, but in most instances, rod ovens are over rated. Sell one to every guy who uses a 7018, call it winning?

                Why...because what they are trying to worry you into preventing, get's introduced not as much from the coating, as by excessive lengthening of the arc.
                Need to improve something, improve that.

                I said your supposed to. But I've never owned one and quite frankly can't imagine doing so? The voice of reason says I don't need to.

                It's not saying there isn't times when the risk requires such controls due to the sensitivity of the material being joined, just that the best storage is in the box un opened. Limit what you open is a good place to start.

                These rods aren't manufactured in a moisture proof vacuum, they are manufactured however to produce a limited diffused hydrogen content. Being hydroscopic, as they are extruded off the line drying from the oven, cooled down, boxed and packaged, hermetically, they give you typically a 4 hour window depending on conditions once opened. And they are manufactured to reduce the effect of moisture absorption. Open a 5lb.'er, use half a box to build a trailer and tape it shut till next time is pretty decent storage.

                Don't believe me, soak one. Maybe you guys are thinking chicken little the sky will fall the sky will fall? I'm just saying, who's buying and who's selling?

                He be the fool who opens a 4 box Lid of 5 lbs boxes just to store then in an oven?
                But I guess if you got a shop full of welders and want to keep them pulling rods quickly to weld...
                Following to a code?
                Need a place to warm lunch...keep it plugged in.
                But if your the average Joe, you use tape to reseal the box.


                Comment


                • #9
                  Actually, if you don't need the proper storage, you're also wasting your time taping the box shut.

                  And sell the rod oven.

                  And the word you are wanting to teach is hygroscopic.
                  Last edited by MAC702; 10-26-2018, 11:14 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    As far as taping the opened box, that's kind of like sealing the bag of chips once opened to retain a degree of freshness. I not only fold the flap a few times I also use a clip.

                    Selling the rod oven? I'm sure a few will. Or wonder if it's worth the price of keeping it around and plugged in?

                    Hygroscopic, my bad. I stand corrected. I appreciate the correction and clarification to my miss use of terminology.
                    Hygroscopic...I got it.

                    Comment

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