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advice on welding 1/4" tube?

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  • advice on welding 1/4" tube?

    i just bought a lincon 140c (used) with pure co2. im new to welding, thus far i have welded 1/2" with a friends 240v hobart years ago for my bumper/grill guard and many hard impacts later its still holding strong. i also welded my first body panels in the other week with my 140.

    i have some 1/2" walled 1.5" dom with some bungs i need to weld in. this will be used for a tierod/drag link on my truck. my thought is to do a fairly heavy bevel, preheat the materials, and run maybe 3 passes on it. the bungs are threaded so ill have to wait for cool down between passes so i dont destroy the threads. the machine lists 5/16 multi pass as its max. i was also considering drilling a hole in the DOM and plug welding the bungs in so there is a mechanical safety dowel basically so if the main weld failed it wouldn't come out.

    i ordered more tube than i need so i plan to do some test welding before going to the main job. what are some ways to sink out heat from the bung to help prevent warpage of the threads?

    thoughts/advice?

  • #2
    If it's just regular mild carbon steel you wouldn't need to preheat it I would think. I've used DOM pipe before. I like it for shafts because it's like cold rolled steel and is closer to exact dimensions that hot rolled pipe. If you are unsure of your welding I would practice a lot on scrap pieces and there are a ton of Mig welding videos on youtube. I was teaching a young welder's helper the other day to mig weld and he thought he was doing good but I had to tell him that "Bubble gum" welds with cold lap ain't gonna make it. and He got it better in an hour's time to where he was laying down some decent beads. It would be a good ideal to grind a V bevel in 1/4 or thicker material. Just weld it hot and make sure you have good tie-ins and no cold lap and you should be fine.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by incc74656i View Post
      i just bought a lincon 140c (used) with pure co2. im new to welding, thus far i have welded 1/2" with a friends 240v hobart years ago for my bumper/grill guard and many hard impacts later its still holding strong. i also welded my first body panels in the other week with my 140.

      i have some 1/2" walled 1.5" dom with some bungs i need to weld in. this will be used for a tierod/drag link on my truck. my thought is to do a fairly heavy bevel, preheat the materials, and run maybe 3 passes on it. the bungs are threaded so ill have to wait for cool down between passes so i dont destroy the threads. the machine lists 5/16 multi pass as its max. i was also considering drilling a hole in the DOM and plug welding the bungs in so there is a mechanical safety dowel basically so if the main weld failed it wouldn't come out.

      i ordered more tube than i need so i plan to do some test welding before going to the main job. what are some ways to sink out heat from the bung to help prevent warpage of the threads?

      thoughts/advice?
      In my province, and BC, and probably most others in Canada, aftermarket-welded steering components are an automatic failure of safety inspection, for good reasons, and attempting the job with a beginning weldor and a welder inadequate to do the job would be prime reasons. The advice given by Ridgerunner is another reason. Steering components are seldom mild steel and are often heat treated unknown alloys to those who attempt to weld them.

      Because of this, most reputable journeymen will refuse the job, and suggest new OEM parts, because they do not wish to endanger the public. How ever there are many who will think little of putting a possible " accident looking for a place to happen" on the road, since they know better.

      See below for one analysis that was done on some manufactured parts after failure. Not the kind of thing you can do in your garage:

      https://met-tech.com/welded-steering...ndle-assembly/
      Last edited by Northweldor; 09-17-2018, 08:25 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by incc74656i View Post
        i just bought a lincon 140c (used) with pure co2. im new to welding, ...

        ...i have some 1/2" walled 1.5" dom with some bungs i need to weld in. this will be used for a tierod/drag link on my truck. ... the machine lists 5/16 multi pass as its max...

        thoughts/advice?
        You will find that the listed maximum is with flux-cored self-shielded wire and multiple passes to achieve that max joint. So you will already be attempting to greatly exceed the listed capabilities of the machine, which is sometimes possible in the hands of a very experienced weldor, which you've admitted not to being.

        These are critical suspension parts on a presumably highway-rated vehicle.

        Further helpful thought: Using capital letters when appropriate actually makes things easier and faster to read.

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        • #5
          The 140 is maxed out on 1/4" with several passes. No way would I pay for a 1/4" thick frame or other part welded with the 140. I use a 180 at work with.035" fluxcore, but only for light gauge material that the bigger wire in a 252 wants to blow through. The 180 has considerably more output than the 140, too, but would be maxed out on 1/4" and that would be far above the rated output of the machine.
          Last edited by gatemaker; 11-01-2018, 07:37 PM.
          fence and gate shop worker
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