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stud welder for shipping container

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  • stud welder for shipping container

    Would any of you have any experience using a stud welder to weld threaded studs into a shipping container...?

    Back in 1982 or so, I was in the US Navy at Bremerton ship yard, and used an industrial stud welder for mounting equipment to the bulkheads.

    Now US Navy ships are made of HY80 steel (armor plate), and shipping containers are from corrugated 1.6-2.1mm (mild...?/galvanized...?) steel.

    So I am clueless on which (or if) a stud welder would even work well.

    Any guidance...?

    thanx...

    william...

  • #2
    Good question. This would be preferable to drilling and bolting in this much thinner material? Easy access to backside? I'm picturing some nasty paint on the shipping container to have to clean off for a good weld.

    Stud welding would be faster for sure, but are you doing enough of them to warrant it over just welding a stud or bolt to the wall?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by hackware View Post
      Would any of you have any experience using a stud welder to weld threaded studs into a shipping container...?

      Back in 1982 or so, I was in the US Navy at Bremerton ship yard, and used an industrial stud welder for mounting equipment to the bulkheads.

      Now US Navy ships are made of HY80 steel (armor plate), and shipping containers are from corrugated 1.6-2.1mm (mild...?/galvanized...?) steel.

      So I am clueless on which (or if) a stud welder would even work well.

      Any guidance...?

      thanx...

      william...
      As Mac702 pointed out, you haven't given enough info on what you want to do. Eg fasten insulation, HD shelving, structural braces etc. stud size , no. of containers, type of stud welder, production line??????

      For about $2000 up to 10000, you can get a stud welder that will do, in seconds, what you can do, in 5 -10 mins. with a stick or mig welder. Is this what you are looking for?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Northweldor View Post

        As Mac702 pointed out, you haven't given enough info on what you want to do. Eg fasten insulation, HD shelving, structural braces etc. stud size , no. of containers, type of stud welder, production line??????

        For about $2000 up to 10000, you can get a stud welder that will do, in seconds, what you can do, in 5 -10 mins. with a stick or mig welder. Is this what you are looking for?
        Ok, main clue was "I am clueless"... ;-)

        I am a computer geek, with a bit of welding / and stud welding experience back in 1982...
        (exclusively --> grind plate until shinny, put stud in that hole, press against bulkhead, press trigger, repeat at next marked spot)...

        My total experience was dealing with US Navy HY80 armor plate (mostly 1/2" thick)...

        I realize that I can NOT weld 1/2" studs to 1.6 to 2.1 mm thick sheet metal and expect good results...

        What I want to do, is find out the maximum size stud that CAN be welded to shipping container side wall sheet metal, and how much I could expect such studs can withstand without damage to the sidewalls...

        Industrial stud welders which handle 3/8" studs (not the auto body repair ones @ $300 or so), start at $1900...

        I want to know how much I CAN do with sidewall studs...

        If I limit myself to container frame locations, 1/2" or even larger can easily be used, but shipping container frame metal is only around the corners, doors, and floor...

        Not very useful for shelves, cabinets, equipment racks, walls, and such...

        I do not know how to calculate stud welding to sheet metal, and how much load such studs and handle...

        I want to build walls, shelving, equipment racks, plumbing brackets, electrical boxes and conduit, and built-in furniture...

        The stud welder I used in the Naval Ship Yard was almost idiot-proof, and yielded strong studs you just placed your braces/box/whatever over, and used washer/nuts to secure...

        I was hoping to do as much as possible the same way on shipping containers...

        I am designing a shop/home using 8 x 20" double door HC shipping containers arranged like a flower...
        (ie: one end facing an octagon, the other end facing out...)
        (each end will have recessed patio door for lighting and access, but NO windows/cutting on sides of containers)

        Sorry if this is long winded, but my only recent welding experience is learning to mig weld...
        (I am trying to find out how to idiot-proof as much as possible...)

        thanx bunches...

        william...

        Comment


        • #5
          With the new info, it sounds as though investment in one of the newer inverter based stud welders might be a good bet for you, especially if it is the type I saw demonstrated, In which the stud base was surrounded by a ceramic collar, the weld started with the stud contacting the metal, then the stud/electrode pulled back against a spring to form an arc, and as the weld current was cut off, the spring forced the stud down into a pool of molten metal contained by the ceramic collar. The result was, when the collar was broken off, was a perfect fillet weld around the base of the stud and perfect penetration. When subject to a hammer test, the stud pulled pulled dime size holes out of the parent metal.

          As I recall, one of the main selling points was a low skill requirement for operation, price was about $2500 new, and they seemed to be using 1/4-516" studs on about the thickness you describe. I don't recall the make,and this was at a Fab show here about 3 years ago.

          For heavier requirements, backing plates or more studs would be possible, Also, used machines are likely available, and resale after completion is likely possible.

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          • #6
            With the cost being what it is (if its a issue) I would just consider going conventional and weld a piece of angle iron to wall with a hole in it to anchor too.... Sounds like cost wise buying a nuclear bomb when all that is needed is a firecracker... But if you buy stud welder and use it, and are done with it, you can always recover some of the costs by selling on CL or ebay....

            Dale
            "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

            Comment


            • #7
              Reason I want to use a stud welder is my hands are in very bad shape...

              I can not do most of the work i've done for the past 35 years, but i'm not ready to roll over and die yet...

              If a stud welder will handle most of the brackets, conduit, plumbing, shelving and walls, then i'm still in the game...

              I still do not have any answers on how big a stud can be used on 1.6-2.1mm sheet steel, and how much load such studs can handle...

              william...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by hackware View Post
                Reason I want to use a stud welder is my hands are in very bad shape...

                I can not do most of the work i've done for the past 35 years, but i'm not ready to roll over and die yet...

                If a stud welder will handle most of the brackets, conduit, plumbing, shelving and walls, then i'm still in the game...

                I still do not have any answers on how big a stud can be used on 1.6-2.1mm sheet steel, and how much load such studs can handle...

                william...
                You do have the answers, if you had done a little research, like others do! If you google the sale price and specs of any of the drawn-arc type machines I described, you will find the stud range.

                Dale, the OP is talking all studs for outfitting EIGHT containers, and $3000 for a new machine that could be easily resold is a long way from "nuclear"!
                Last edited by Northweldor; 08-16-2018, 09:54 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Northweldor View Post

                  You do have the answers, if you had done a little research, like others do! If you google the sale price and specs of any of the drawn-arc type machines I described, you will find the stud range.

                  Dale, the OP is talking all studs for outfitting EIGHT containers, and $3000 for a new machine that could be easily resold is a long way from "nuclear"!
                  Well, I thought I WAS doing research... ;-)

                  3 different stud welder manufacturing sites list the holding strength of the STUDS, (great: 1/2" stud will hold 874 pounds), but NOT what the sheet metal can withstand (3/8, 1/4, 5/16, ...???)... Vendors for sheet metal seem to be no help (welded studs not their billywack...)

                  I'm not lazy, just don't know who/where to ask...

                  Perhaps what I want is not feasible, just wish I could find REAL ANSWERS...

                  william...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hackware View Post

                    Well, I thought I WAS doing research... ;-)

                    3 different stud welder manufacturing sites list the holding strength of the STUDS, (great: 1/2" stud will hold 874 pounds), but NOT what the sheet metal can withstand (3/8, 1/4, 5/16, ...???)... Vendors for sheet metal seem to be no help (welded studs not their billywack...)

                    I'm not lazy, just don't know who/where to ask...

                    Perhaps what I want is not feasible, just wish I could find REAL ANSWERS...

                    william...
                    The tensile strength of mild steel is about 60000 PS!, and most bolts would be higher, if more than grade one. Not sure what holding strength of "874 pounds" is, unless it's foot-pounds of torque. Post a link to that.

                    Your plan is feasible, as outlined in post # 5, What other "REAL ANSWERS" do you need?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hackware View Post

                      Perhaps what I want is not feasible, just wish I could find REAL ANSWERS...

                      william...
                      There is no REAL ANSWER you can or will get with generic questions. You want to know what a bolt will hold, but the usage determines that answer. A simple example showing how different the answers woud be is it holding a small, heavy object close to a wall, or a shelf that will be loaded 18" away from the wall? One of those answers will be a lot higher number than the other, and the smaller number would change dramatically depending on the design of the shelf bracket. If you want exact answers, get an engineering firm to do spec drawings based on your designs.


                      Good luck
                      "never argue with an idiot; he'll bring you down to his level, and win by experience"

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