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18 ga steel tubing

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  • 18 ga steel tubing

    I just bought a Hobart 210 Handler. I am working a project with 18 ga steel using gasless flex core wire. Even on the lowest setting a burn though. Do I need to use solid core with gas with 18 ga?

  • #2
    Yup.
    I have a 210. Love it.
    On 18 gauge I use .024 with 75/25.
    Even on the lowest setting I have learned to watch the HAZ.
    If things get too hot, I will stop and let the color go away, then start again.
    One trick with thin tubing is to keep it vented. Do not try and close the whole thing up too soon.
    Especially on small projects. The trapped air will actually blow outwards on the last part of a weld if it is too heated.
    If you need total closure, leave a small bit unwelded, let it cool down internally, then blip it closed.

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    • #3
      It is possible to do with flux core. It just takes effort. I suggest .035 if you have been using smaller wire.

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      • #4
        You just bought the welder. How much welding experience do you have? If not much, burn a lot of wire practicing.

        Have you tried just stitching around the tube, letting it cool and then filling in between the stitches? It's an easy way to control the heat.

        Also, are these critical welds, decorative or what?
        "never argue with an idiot; he'll bring you down to his level, and win by experience"

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        • #5
          Thanks for feedback

          Originally posted by mike landrich View Post
          You just bought the welder. How much welding experience do you have? If not much, burn a lot of wire practicing.

          Have you tried just stitching around the tube, letting it cool and then filling in between the stitches? It's an easy way to control the heat.

          Also, are these critical welds, decorative or what?
          Thanks for the feedback ... I'm going to get "gas" and try it again. I haven't welded in 30 years ... and wasn't very good then. I'm having a good time trying different things.

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          • #6
            I've done similar before using .030 flux core. It takes a bit of time because the material won't take the heat well.

            As has been suggested, making small welds at regular intervals and then gradually connecting them works well when you have too much heat for the application.

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            • #7
              030" wire

              Even .030" flux core wire could be used. You just have to have good, tight fit. .030" solid wire and gas will definitely be easier. .024" wire is not good for much and has more feed problems than .030" wire. If using .030" wire do not put much weave into your bead. just run straight. If using solid wire of this size do not turn up the gas to compensate for windy conditions. You just need enough gas to shield the weld while it cools. Too much gas can blow the puddle around on thin stuff.
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