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  • Milliamp question

    Hey, guys, I have an industrial animal scale that will run off 4 "D" cells or 6v / 10mA power. I have a 6v 500mA power supply, can I rig it up to use this power supply, or will it fry the board? I was thinking that it could handle the bigger power supply cause it would only draw what it needed...is that correct? Or am I missing something?

  • #2
    I'm not for sure on that one

    Personally I would think i would try it, the question is, is it worth the risk of destroying the equipment, maybe it has a fuse that would go first. If you can identify a fuse it would be worth a try. Hopefully someone can offer u a better answer.

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    • #3
      10m Amp is minimum more is ok it only uses what it needs. Must make sure polarity on correct. Your larger power supply might draw more power from wall no load.

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      • #4
        If it is a decent quality power supply, meaning the 6 volts is well regulated, then sure. It's like using a 12v car battery instead of a 12v lawnmower battery - it just has more capacity. Measure the output voltage with no load and see where it sits. If it's 6 volts, it's 6 volts.

        Do be sure it is DC, and double-check the polarity of the connector as mentioned.
        --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

        Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
        -------------------------

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Rocky D View Post
          Hey, guys, I have an industrial animal scale that will run off 4 "D" cells or 6v / 10mA power. I have a 6v 500mA power supply, can I rig it up to use this power supply, or will it fry the board? I was thinking that it could handle the bigger power supply cause it would only draw what it needed...is that correct? Or am I missing something?
          typically, a power supply rating can be read as
          "as long as the load draws less than 500ma, the supply
          will keep 6v across the terminals"

          another way to think of it -- the big honking cable connecting
          your home to the power grid can deliver many 100's (1000's?)
          of amps.... but if all you have is a single 1/4w night light running,
          it doesn't shove all those 100's of amps down the poor night light's
          throat...

          frank

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          • #6
            Rocky, no problem just be cerain of the polarity
            Harold
            Harold
            Craftsman Colormatic AC
            Victor Journyman Setup
            Syncrowave 180 SD
            MM210 With Spoolgun
            Dynasty 200 DX
            Spectrum 625 Plasma Cutter
            Miller HD Tape Measure

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            • #7
              The only risk is that the power supply with more capacity COULD provide that additional capacity to your device in the event of a primary failure. This COULD result in a fire or other such damage in the device itself, after an initial failure occurred.

              It's like popping the 20 amp fuse out of the panel and replacing it with a 1000 amp fuse. No problem while things are working fine, but could cause a major problem when you have a short in your toaster.

              If you want to be truly safe - put an inline 15mA fuse just ahead of your connector. But in reality - 500mA at 6V is only 3 watts- not a huge amount of power.

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