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So, Here's my first 'NEWBIE' question..

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  • So, Here's my first 'NEWBIE' question..

    I am having a welding table built by my buddy and fellow fabricator,
    with a steel table-top of 3/8" thickness...........
    My question is......I don't have the table yet, and just bought my first Hobart (135) yesterday and I am anxious to get started practicing my first welds.......
    I construct very small pieces (Pro Tattoo Machine frames/Guns to the less educated) and I only need a small area to weld upon.

    I am a little confused about 'Grounding'.......

    Is it safe to errect a couple of concrete blocks in my garage and then place a fairly long piece of steel between them, clamp the steel to the blocks, and THEN ground my welder on 'that' piece of steel? Will this create the proper 'ground'?

    I know this probably sounds radiculously precarious but I have always done Bronze brazing in this manner with NO problems at all......I am VERY careful, and always watch my workspace very well.

    If anybody has a better temporary solution please feel free to mention it.
    ANY advice on the subject of 'Grounding' would be Greatly appreciated!
    Thanks to all who answer my question.

  • #2
    As long as you are talking about the ground clamp of your welder instead of the ground for the welder's electrical service connection, you'll be good to go. You should have a fine enough ground for the work you need to do, but if not just make a steel jig plate to hold your tattoo gun frame in and weld a bolt to it and use that to attach the welder's ground clamp. A jig plate would probably be a good idea anyway as it will allow you to add means to clamp the gun frame down to prevent warpage and keep the parts in alignment.
    Last edited by Wyoming; 02-23-2009, 07:41 AM.
    Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

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    • #3
      Thanks so much, This would seem to answer my question.
      Yes, I was refering to the grounding 'clamp' itself...............
      That Jig idea is exellent too.....I'm going to give that a try.

      With that said, let the welding begin!

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      • #4
        Tat,
        If you are just starting out in welding with elec., make sure you use solid wire and a bottle of shielding gas or you'll be grinding, sanding, buffing those frames until the cows come home to get all the spatter off from flux core wire...not to mention gnashing your teeth.
        Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

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        • #5
          Thanks man, yeah, I'll be using .35 wire and 75% Argon/25%co2 Mix.
          My buddy sold me the unit, bottle(half full)..Cart, and all kinds of extras...
          Thanks again for the advice.......VERY much appreciated.

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          • #6
            I wouldn't use wire that big. You will be better off with .030 or .023 wire for that machine and your needs.
            Jim

            Miller MM 210
            Miller Dialarc 250P
            Airco 225 engine driven
            Victor O/A
            Lots of other tools and always wanting more

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jim-Tx View Post
              I wouldn't use wire that big. You will be better off with .030 or .023 wire for that machine and your needs.
              I'll be even a little more emphatic than Jim and say your machine is not designed to run .035 solid wire. Download the owner's manual at the top of this page and look at Page 20.

              You're setting yourself up for disappointment from the start by trying run a wire that the machine does not have the current density to handle.
              Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
              Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

              Victor Superrange II * Victor Journeyman

              Hobart HH 125EZ


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              • #8
                Thanks guys....I'll download the manual and check it out.......I thought it was good for .35,.......but It came with a LOT of .30 wire and tips etc....so I'll give it a shot.

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