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  • I can't see my work...

    Some one please educate me...

    I am a novice welder at best. That means I only weld maybe 1 time a month -
    Mostly MIG with my 187 - occasionaly stick. And this is usually when something is in need of repair - or I need to make a jig for my custom wood shop.

    My question is simple... Is my sheild too dark??? In good bright sunlight, I can not see any thing of my work in front of me. When I strike an arc I can see my work - but I still want to see better.

    I have a very cheap lid from Central Tractor - I am not in the mood to spend a fortune on a high quality lid - is there a scale or test to know that I have the right sheild?? Meaning too little or too much???

    Thanks.

    Ed

  • #2
    Try this list...

    http://ehs.unl.edu/sop/s-welding_lens_shading.pdf

    The lens you would use on the typical stick weld, as sold for your hood, is darker than what you would use on your 187 due to the potential of having it used for heavy amp work. Also helps to keep a strong light on the work.
    Last edited by Wyoming; 01-04-2009, 05:47 PM.
    Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

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    • #3
      Thank you Wyoming -

      Looks like i should be in the "12" range.

      I am a perfectionist in my shop and in my work - I know I can lay down a better bead than I am - I hope being able to see what I am doing helps.

      Ed

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      • #4
        try a '10'

        If I'm using a fixed shade helmet I prefer a shade 10 for most welding. Any darker than that is too dark for me...
        Miller Dynasty 200DX
        Hobart T225 Stick
        Hobart Handler 180
        Airco O/A Rig
        ESAB W-200 O/A torch

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        • #5
          Like Wyoming says...keep a strong light on the weld area. Auto dark helmet would help a lot, but some of the less expensive ones have a problem operating in Sunlight (stay dark all the time).
          "Good Enough Never Is"

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          • #6
            I found that any time I weld in the sun it's harder to see. Make sure you don't have the sun shining in the hood from the back. That will help a lot.
            MPK
            Welder-Miller Thunderbolt AC 225-DC 150
            Plasma- Miller Spectrum 300
            O/P torch - Victor 100

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            • #7
              that's odd, because I find the sunlight makes it very easy for me to see my work. I have trouble in artificial light. I sometimes move my work to where the garage window lets the sunlight in just for this reason. Doesn't work well on rainy days though.

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              • #8
                Thank you all -

                I will look into what has been suggested - however I know that the biggest help would be for me to spend more time doing it!!

                I know a better hood is in order - but practice and comfort level will be the biggest improvement I could make.

                Ed

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                • #9
                  On second thought, I only have trouble in the sun when it shines in the back of my shield.
                  MPK
                  Welder-Miller Thunderbolt AC 225-DC 150
                  Plasma- Miller Spectrum 300
                  O/P torch - Victor 100

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                  • #10
                    I have a hard time seeing anything but the inside of my hood in bright sunlight. The solution is to either try facing another way (without the sun at your back) or better yet make a drape from some cloth to go over the back of your hood and keep backlight out. This was suggested by others on the forum and worked for me anyway.
                    Lincoln 175HD
                    Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC
                    Smith AW1, Dillon (Henrob) Mark III & Smith Quickbraze Little Torch

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by smyrna5 View Post
                      I have a hard time seeing anything but the inside of my hood in bright sunlight. The solution is to either try facing another way (without the sun at your back) or better yet make a drape from some cloth to go over the back of your hood and keep backlight out. This was suggested by others on the forum and worked for me anyway.
                      Cloth will work. Am thinking of making myself a pancake hood.

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                      • #12
                        As others suggested keep the sun in front of you. Also you might just have too dark of a lens. I use a 10 for just about everything until I get up in the 170amp> range. I could probably go down to a 9 for some low amp TIG work but just too lazy to change.

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