Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I feel like I'm getting taken advantage of

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I feel like I'm getting taken advantage of

    I work for a construction co.,mostly fine woodworking.My boss knows I like to weld so when we need something welded I get to do it.I like the practice but I'm not getting anything extra for using my welder/gas etc.. Now they want me to make a handrail ,no problem but I really feel I should be compensated above my wage's.I'm thinking something like 100 bucks per day for my welder.Does that sound fair?

  • #2
    Hey Vince,
    Yes, you are being taking advantage of, and that is because YOU allowed it initially without establishing the parameters to your boss/company regarding any welding. You need to make it perfectly clear that you don't have a problem doing some work for them, but your "extra" skills are worth additional compensation. Simply tell them they are welcome to call any of the commercial welders & see what they would charge to do those jobs/repairs. You need to "open their eyes". The only persons who ever got free work from me were my parents.....because I will always "owe" them.....everyone else gotta pay, even other family members. If you do freebie work, you will always get taken advantage of..... and, surprisingly, family will do it the most. Don't negotiate your skills, materials and time. Keep the Yellow Pages handy & simply tell everyone they are welcome to call any of the outfits listed under "WELDING" or "WELDING/FABRICATION". It's called....."Spreading the wealth".... Denny
    Complete weld/mach./fab shop
    Mobile unit

    "A man's word is his honor...without honor, there is nothing."

    "Words are like bullets.... once they leave your muzzle, you cannot get them back."

    "I have no hesitation to kill nor reservation to die for the American Flag & the US Constitution."

    Comment


    • #3
      You already know the answer to your question. How many other people in your shop do "extra" work for the company? Your skills are valuable. Don't give them away to those that don't appreciate it.
      Two turn tables and a microphone.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks guys...time to put my foot down.I have said to my boss That I should get something extra.I weld but still nothing.This time the welder stays home untill the money gets right.
        Last week I even got some more tools for the welding side of my work.
        Milwaulkee porta band
        Pipe and tubing notcher
        I'm a firm believer in having the correct tools for whatever you are working on.
        I don't call myself a welder but from coming to sites like this and others like it I'm learning more all the time.

        Comment


        • #5
          think about the economy...

          In normal times I would agree witht the other posters that you should be well-rewarded for going the extra mile and welding at work. However, these are not normal times - we are facing the worst economy since the Great Depression. It is likely that we could see unemployment in excess of 10% in 2009.

          The fact that you can weld and are happy to do it could possibly keep you employed longer while guys around you are getting laid off. I've been involved in lay-offs and the people who survive the longest are those who are seen as 'being on the team'.

          Perhaps you could get the company to buy your consumables? Be careful how you play this hand...
          Miller Dynasty 200DX
          Hobart T225 Stick
          Hobart Handler 180
          Airco O/A Rig
          ESAB W-200 O/A torch

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeaaahhh, I'm not sure I'd march in there banging your fist on the table and saying pay me more or ELSE.

            If it's part of your normal work hours and associated with the business of the company, I personally don't see how you're entitled to more pay for it. You might deserve more pay for an extra skill, but as Villemur says, these are desperate times.

            The only real issue here in my mind is that they're having you use your personal equipment, which isn't even so strange in itself as tradesmen are frequently expected to have their own tools. But one thing you may consider is proposing that your boss purchase welding equipment that belongs to the company so that they can take advantage of these additional revenue opportunities. If you play it right, maybe you can get him to buy something really nice and then you'll be the one getting to use it.
            Trailblazer 302 * Millermatic 212 * Syncrowave 180SD * X-Treme 12VS Feeder * Spoolmate 3035
            Thermal Dynamics Cutmaster 52 Plasma * Lincoln 175 MIG

            Victor Superrange II * Victor Journeyman

            Hobart HH 125EZ


            Comment


            • #7
              They hired you buddy. Not your car, house, wrenches, cellphone, shovel, etc. You get it now?

              If the work is needed to run the business, then somebody is going to have to do it. Why not you, but the company should buy the equipment or rent it from you. Make it worth your while if they agree to pay the rental fee.
              Two turn tables and a microphone.

              Comment


              • #8
                i agree with villemur... if you could walk out of there today and be working by the end of the day then i would say ask them to compensate you but if you dont have the comfort of job security with todays economy you might accomplish more by saying i would love to but im out of gas or wire or something along that lines..they may say what do you need and ill order it..at the minimum i would say you might get yourself some free filler wire or save yourself the time and gas
                miller syncrowave 200

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by villemur View Post
                  In normal times I would agree witht the other posters that you should be well-rewarded for going the extra mile and welding at work. However, these are not normal times - we are facing the worst economy since the Great Depression. It is likely that we could see unemployment in excess of 10% in 2009.

                  The fact that you can weld and are happy to do it could possibly keep you employed longer while guys around you are getting laid off. I've been involved in lay-offs and the people who survive the longest are those who are seen as 'being on the team'.

                  Perhaps you could get the company to buy your consumables? Be careful how you play this hand...
                  I agree totally with VILLEMUR...the last thing I ever wanted to hear from an employee was "that's not in my job description"....be cheerful, eager, team member. Suggest a reasonable reimbursement for the wire and gas (because they will have no clue, be sure to offer a reasonable figure...and it is not $100.00 a day).

                  Look at it like this...you are learning on their dime, and wouldn't you rather be doing some nice setup (using that new notcher), and getting in some out of position practice...lots of guys here wish their boss would let them practice some welding instead of doing the same old thing.

                  It's an opportunity to approach each little job as an exercise in seeking perfection...right settings, right filler, right prep, etc. Just pursue that and you'll find yourself proud to point out the "I did that" little places in the plant...and don't think that excellence will escape the higher-ups attention.
                  "Good Enough Never Is"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hotfoot View Post
                    I agree totally with VILLEMUR...the last thing I ever wanted to hear from an employee was "that's not in my job description"....be cheerful, eager, team member. Suggest a reasonable reimbursement for the wire and gas (because they will have no clue, be sure to offer a reasonable figure...and it is not $100.00 a day).

                    Look at it like this...you are learning on their dime, and wouldn't you rather be doing some nice setup (using that new notcher), and getting in some out of position practice...lots of guys here wish their boss would let them practice some welding instead of doing the same old thing.

                    It's an opportunity to approach each little job as an exercise in seeking perfection...right settings, right filler, right prep, etc. Just pursue that and you'll find yourself proud to point out the "I did that" little places in the plant...and don't think that excellence will escape the higher-ups attention.
                    Hotfoot that is reason I've been doing it,I'm getting some hood time on their dime.
                    I'll just be honest ..tell them how I feel and my welder was not cheap.That will cost them something.
                    The stuff we do is very high end for very rich customer's...I don't see us getting slow (yet) and yep having another skill makes me more valuable to my company.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree that you are being taken advantage of.

                      I would itemize the cost of the consumables and materials, and let your employer know that you need reimbursement for these costs, or for the company to supply these items. It does add up.

                      As to $100 a day for the use of the machine... That is steep. I can rent a 4-pak of 300A machines (XMT's) for about $250/week bare, delivered. A single machine is about $80/week (last time I rented a single was 2 years ago, but the price lists haven't changes much.)

                      You might try for a tool allotment for tools you use on these jobs to account for wear and tear, or get the company to do a partial or full reimbursement for tools purchased principally for their jobs. What's wear and tear? I get a year or so moderate use out of a $50 grinder (Dewalt on sale, Makita, etc), so I would put the wear and tear price at about $1/week for a grinder. The welding machine? Depends. I charge out at $20/day for me to show up with my Maxstar 150, on top of my hourly rate (though this is normally just figured into the job cost, since I don't do all that much on my own and don't tend to do hourly jobs, and most are one day or less. I'm using the customers power on site, no oil to change, no fuel charges, so this covers the wear and tear for me). I build into the rate things like filler and shielding gas. The company charges something $50/day or $100/week (I think) for the engine drives to bring them to a job. This is on top of the other hourly rates for the welder, helpers, the cost of consumables (a seperate line item), etc.
                      I may not be good looking, but I make up for it with my dazzling lack of personality

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree with the others. If it were me, I would make sure they paid for consumables and if they are doing that well, I would have them pay you a tool allowance maybe qaurterly or a fee based on the job. Basically this will save them from buying or renting the tools and you can use it to replace or add tools of your own. The price would depend on how much you are welding. Ifs its all the time, they need to buy their own stuff. You would make your self more valuable and hence will most likely get pay increases because of it.
                        Mike

                        HH210 & 3035 Spool Gun
                        HTP 221 Tig
                        Powermax 30 plasma
                        HF bandsaw
                        HF hood

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Either say your welder is broken and you can't do the work anymore, or else do the welding work on contract. You state the price and if your boss doesn't like it then he can contact any other local welders to do the job. If you're doing it for "fun" and not to survive on then I'm sure your price will be competitive enough that you will nearly always get the job and paid the price you want.
                          Conrad Andres
                          Thermal Arc 185TSW
                          Lincoln SP135T

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree a little with everyone here but sorta have my own spin on it as well

                            I feel a "high end" woodworker is worth every penny that a welder is. If you see what he gets for a job then you understand that.

                            Learn how to communicate better from here on out. It is actually very cool your boss recognizes your valuable skills. Keep track of all your expenses and keep your boss informed of them as you go. If he is a stand up guy you'll get paid, but he will need some kind of record. Don't try to make extra cash on them...he can prolly get them cheaper than you if he wanted. Otherwise send him out for the consumables from here on out and also get them on his account.
                            I have been in this situation several times myself in the past.
                            Also don't forget the INSURANCE POLICY that he has covering you while doing all this as well. He might have to upgrade this and it could end this work from now on.
                            You might from time to time mention a certain welding machine you would like to have at work now and then also have yours either "break down" or get busy on another job enuff that not owning his own machine becomes a bottleneck in the work.
                            Oh yeah and did I mention the INSURANCE POLICY? Sawdust and fire...
                            If you choose to go with your own insurance etc. then bid your total cost and submit it just like any other sub-contractor.
                            Just my take on this situation YMMV
                            Miller Dynasty 700...oh yea baby!
                            MM 350P PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
                            Miller Bobcat 225 NT
                            Miller Dynasty 200 DX
                            Miller WC-115-A
                            Miller 30-A spoolgun
                            Airco 300 Heliwelder (465 amp and made by Miller)
                            Miller Spectrum 300
                            Lincoln SP-135-Plus (down the road now)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Great advice coming from all you guys thanks.
                              enlpck answered my question ...I didn't know what a fair price was for using my welder.I get reimbursed for everything that I buy for our jobs,this would include anything for welding that I would need.
                              He is a stand up guy maybe I will send him a link to this thread.
                              Maybe I'll just send him a link to this thread and let him decide..I do get paid well and do whatever I'm asked.
                              Last edited by IamVince; 12-30-2008, 03:12 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X