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Plating 1/2" 12"x12"x13' with 1/2"x12' flat bar

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  • Plating 1/2" 12"x12"x13' with 1/2"x12' flat bar

    I'm trying to plate a 13' length of1/2"X 12"x12" box tubing with 1/2"x12" flatbar. Does any one know a procedure that will allow me to do this without warping the box tubing. The application is for a heavy duty wrecker outer boom. I was told that the tubing needed to be put in a large press and preloaded before welding. Being that I dont have a very large press I need another option. Any ideas welcomed. thanks Joe Z . Shoreline Towing
    Last edited by Joe Shoreline; 12-10-2008, 08:24 PM. Reason: typo

  • #2
    How many sides does the plating get applied to? If it's one, versus 2, versus 4, will make a huge difference in how you can go about it.

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    • #3
      It would be 1 side.The plating would need to be on the top only. thanks

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      • #4
        Plating opposite sides would help. It's an option, if not a good one...

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        • #5
          Is this for a wear plate or structural value? Intermittent rosette welds instead of full length fillet welds could be your best way. Something like, : : : : :
          Two turn tables and a microphone.

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          • #6
            Shoreline,

            Not trying to throw a wet blanket on the party, but your initial post seemed to indicate that this "plating" would be on a heavy duty wrecker boom. If that is the case, then I think we have "many" additional issues to deal with besides not warping the boom with welding.

            Lifting equipment such as cranes, forklifts, travelifts, overhead trolly systems, etc. must be inspected for safety on a regular basis. A boom on a "heavy duty wrecker" I suspect meets these requirements.

            Who did the "engineering/structural analysis" to determine that simply adding a plate to the top member would give you the load bearing capacity you need. Wrecker/crane booms are engineered to meet a certain capacity. I'm not at all sure yours was.

            Should this "homebrew" boom fail in operation, thereby injuring someone or others property, I suspect you'd have a lawsuit on your hands that could bankrupt you.

            For your own protection (as well as others), I would recommend that you seek out a qualified structural engineer and have him design a boom that meets your load requirements. That design should also should provide guidance as to how the boom should be welded to achieve max capacity.

            Just my .02.
            SundownIII

            Syncrowave 250DX, Tigrunner
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            Mil Mod 6370-21 Metal Cut Saw
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            Miller BWE and BWE Dig

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            • #7
              Here is a link to one of the the best, in my opinion, heat straightening manuals out today. This should be more than information for your project.

              http://isddc.dot.gov/OLPWeb.ASP?WCI=...1%26rc%3d1&WCU
              "Religion is regarded by the common people as true, by the wise as false, and by the rulers as useful."

              -- Seneca the Younger

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              • #8
                Hey Joe,

                Sundown III is probably right but he is used to dealing with the super rich that have money and time to spend, However, if it needs to be done and you have to do it right now, then I would get extra steel and, temporally, weld it to the bottom of the boom. This would bring the stress to the bottom first and when you weld on the top it should straighten it back out after it's cooled down. Then grind the welds and extra steel off the bottom without using a high heat source like a torch.

                I'd look into it a bit more but I've done heavy truck and boom work and I know this would work. Some of us just can't afford engineers and we have to rely on real world knowledge to get the job done.
                Weldor @ Bay Area Metal Works

                1947 Sureweld DC
                1975 Miller HF
                1994 5HP 2 Stage 80 Gallon Campbell Hausfeld
                Pipe Bender
                Soild Rod & Flat Bar Bender
                DeWalt 12'' Chop Saw
                Ohio Forge 10'' Miter Saw
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                Extra Box As well
                More Hand Tools Than I Know What To Do With
                2 Hand Grinders
                1 Bench Grinder
                Ridged Stand Up Drill Press
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                • #9
                  Trep,

                  Good to hear thet you think I only deal with the "Rich and Famous".

                  I can assure you that after being a military engineer for more than 22 years, you won't find someone with a more "get er done" attitude. I've built bridges that the "experts" at Ft Belvoir said couldn't be built. I've welded armor plate to Cat D9 ROPS (definite NO NO) to protect French operators (Beiruit-'82). etc, etc, etc. A little schooling (Civil Engineer) and a little mechanical appitude can go a long ways.

                  If we were talking about a farmer building a boom to rip a stump out of the ground it would be one thing. Here we're talking about a "commercial operator" (Shoreline Towing) who has to deal with major liability issues as well as a rather aggressive DOT. (NY Dept of Trans)

                  Here we're talking about a boom which will weigh in excess of 1350#. (989 for the box beam, 265 for the plating). A structural engineer may, in fact, be able to design a boom that weighs less and is much stronger. In any case, the liability would shift to the engineer, not the owner/operator.

                  Heavy wrecker service has implications not openly obvious. Besides, if the DOT pulls him off the road for the use of a "non-approved" piece of equipment, who's gained anything.

                  These issues were the basis for my previous comments. Sometimes we can be "penny wise and dollar foolish".
                  SundownIII

                  Syncrowave 250DX, Tigrunner
                  Dynasty 200 DX w/CM 3
                  MM 251 w/30 A SG
                  HH 187 Mig
                  XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Pulser
                  Dialarc 250 w/HF 15-1
                  Hypertherm PM 1250 Plasma
                  Victor, Harris, and Smith O/A
                  PC Dry Cut Saw and (just added) Wilton (7x12) BS
                  Mil Mod 6370-21 Metal Cut Saw
                  More grinders than hands (Makita & Dewalt)
                  Grizzly 6"x48" Belt Sander
                  Access to full fab shop w/CNC Plasma & Waterjet
                  Gas mixers (Smith(2) and Thermco)
                  Miller BWE and BWE Dig

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I assumed he would be copying an existing design?
                    http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Liability issues a side, I am wondering if you really need to be concerned with warpage. You've got a heck of a big piece of tubing you are dealing with. Unless the stiffener was going to be welded continuously the full length to the tube I think warpage would be nill with stitch welds.

                      Also considering the radius of the edges of the tube do you really need a 12" wide strap/stiffener? An 11" (roughly) strap would lay on the top of the tube and would avoid such a big area to fill in the void of the radius to the stiffener.

                      If you did decide to preload the tube and didn't have a press you could make "Bow" with a length of chain attached to each end of the tube and a Porta Power centered on the tube opposite of the side to be strapped. The Porta Power pushes against the beam and the chain to preload the tube.

                      My $.02, mileage and results will vary

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                      • #12
                        Now I want to see that "PORTA POWER"!!!
                        SundownIII

                        Syncrowave 250DX, Tigrunner
                        Dynasty 200 DX w/CM 3
                        MM 251 w/30 A SG
                        HH 187 Mig
                        XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Pulser
                        Dialarc 250 w/HF 15-1
                        Hypertherm PM 1250 Plasma
                        Victor, Harris, and Smith O/A
                        PC Dry Cut Saw and (just added) Wilton (7x12) BS
                        Mil Mod 6370-21 Metal Cut Saw
                        More grinders than hands (Makita & Dewalt)
                        Grizzly 6"x48" Belt Sander
                        Access to full fab shop w/CNC Plasma & Waterjet
                        Gas mixers (Smith(2) and Thermco)
                        Miller BWE and BWE Dig

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
                          Now I want to see that "PORTA POWER"!!!
                          For real! A porta power that big would need a forklift to move it around.
                          Two turn tables and a microphone.

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