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  • Ironman 250

    I have a 3/10 wire running to my garage about 75 feet away to a double 30 amp breaker. I was planning to get a Ironman 210, however I am going to look at a used Ironman 250 today. He wants to sell for $700.. Will this work, if I don't run it wide open. Say 3/8 of an inch, and does it have the same plug as the Ironman 310?

  • #2
    Ironman

    Sorryr, I mente 210

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    • #3
      They both have the same 6-50P plug, but the 250 uses 8 guage wires (10 guage ground) while the 210 uses 12 guage wires.

      Your 10/3 line should be good for both machines according to the owner's manuals, but you might be limited on any extension cord you wanted to put between the 250 and the wall outlet.

      The 250 wants a 40a time delay or 50a standard fuse. The breaker you have would work fine for the 210.

      I got all this from the owner's manuals on this site.

      My suggestion is to get a 50a breaker and go for the 250 if it works well.

      GS
      I live in my own little world. That's OK, they understand me here.

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      • #4
        No, this wire has other things on it besides the welder as I recall and is service to the garage, it cannot be breaker-ed up for a welding machine.
        http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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        • #5
          I understood from his "double 30a breaker" that it was already carrying 230v. I assumed there was no other load on it. But you are of course correct, if there is other load, he can't do what I suggested.

          GS
          I live in my own little world. That's OK, they understand me here.

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          • #6
            250

            There will be nothing else running while using the welder.

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            • #7
              re250

              GilaSlim,I don't know why I would use a 50 amy breaker on a 10/3 wire. I don't understand this so I thik I will forgeet about the 250 welder.
              Thanks, anyway

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              • #8
                If this wire was exclusive to that machine there are allowances for larger breakers, I agree, skip the 250 machine.
                http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                • #9
                  If this wire continues to be an issue there is no good way around digging it up and putting in a suitable service. Lots of guys have made it with a 30A but they are careful and keep to equipment that it will supply. It wouldn't scare me to use the shovel though. I was going to use a 10 to my storage building at one point then I get real and reconsider it in a hurry, would have been a regrettable mistake at some point.
                  http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Graham Brown View Post
                    GilaSlim,I don't know why I would use a 50 amy breaker on a 10/3 wire. I don't understand this so I thik I will forgeet about the 250 welder.
                    I'm just reading the owner's manual. According to Hobart, if you have 230v service, 10 g is the minimum wire size (8 g would be better). A 40a time delay or 50a standard breaker would be the maximum size. Yes, the service would probably be maxed out, but it should work. Yes, you could run with a smaller breaker, but you might not be able to run the unit at max output. Myself, I would get the bigger unit and try it. Hobart wouldn't lie, would they?
                    I live in my own little world. That's OK, they understand me here.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GilaSlim View Post
                      I'm just reading the owner's manual. According to Hobart, if you have 230v service, 10 g is the minimum wire size (8 g would be better). A 40a time delay or 50a standard breaker would be the maximum size. Yes, the service would probably be maxed out, but it should work. Yes, you could run with a smaller breaker, but you might not be able to run the unit at max output. Myself, I would get the bigger unit and try it. Hobart wouldn't lie, would they?
                      Like SBerry pointed out, the 10/3 is feeding a service sub panel in the garage, not just an individual welding branch circuit. By Code it can't have over a 30 amp fuse or circuit breaker. Welding branch circuit is another matter.
                      Retired...
                      Master Electrician
                      Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter
                      Semi-pro/Hobby Welder
                      Hobart Handler 140
                      MakerGear M2 3D Printer


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                      • #12
                        250

                        I just looked at a that welder. It is an old Hobart Bett 250 welder with a five foot tank on it and has two big spools of .035 wire. Does anybody know anything about this welder?

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                        • #13
                          If its what I am thinking it is a good machine but relatively obsolete for the Do it Yourselfer. The bottle and the wire are likely worth 400 alone though so you are looking at a 300$ machine give or take a little. For what its worth I might consider a wire upgrade if you are wanting to collect old equipment. For most people new is so competitive anymore and the warranties are so good unless you have expertise in repair it takes some of the advantage away from buying new.
                          http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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                          • #14
                            250

                            Thanks SBerry, I think that I will pass it up.

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                            • #15
                              Grahm, I have been down most of the roads regarding equipment purchases of this nature including buying machines that were not right for me at the time. I could have made some better purchases in regards to getting more use for the money, etc. My own background tended to prejudice my thinking,,, this is what we use at work,, kind of thinking. In reality I should have bought an AC/DC buzzer followed by a wire feeder, at the time I was more interested in other things.
                              But after 30 yrs I tend to look at things different and the same. I will follow the theory in many cases that it pays to buy new, if I got a machine I am going to lean on the last thing I want is a bunch of someones else's worn problems, these machines work so well and so long they live way beyond there depreciation even with and especially for constant use.
                              As for the 250 you look at it might have been of interest to someone like myself who was willing to gamble on the numbers, could use the extra bottle and the wire so risking 300 or so on the machine would have been acceptable and I am now the mechanic that if it needed a little TLC I have the means to fix it, possibly for pennies on the dollar without it being a big expensive gut wrenching pain in the azz. I also have the potential use for it and it would be added to a fleet and if its reliability was an issue it wouldn't be a deal breaker or stop me in my tracks, I have a redundant machine. Kind of like a serious pipeliner having 2 machines.
                              At homes/hobby/small shops, technical support is or may be non existent or expensive, space limited as well as power and the real demand for that greedy, used, likely worn, the list of negatives could go on, the only real positive being the potential to save SOME money. For the small shop, practical is the name of the game, easy to move, store, wire, has great factory and internet support, its really hard to beat up on hiking down and plopping down for a new 187 or 210 and call it a day without a single days worth of buyers remorse.
                              Profit margins are low on this item, ain't like a new sofa where the store paid 200 and sold it to you "on sale" for 100$, some of the margins are 10%, they are after the consumable business and they ain't gonna make another nickle selling you some piece of crap that will be junk gathering dust while you are still on your first 2# spool of flux core. I sell a guy a 140 a while back and he spend another 600 to go with it, bottle, wire, hood, spare tips. He gonna use it. These companies are at war for "how good it works", tons of technical effort spent to tune this machine to work as good as they can.
                              That 250 feeder is designed for a steady diet 035-045 wire, one of these little ones are designed for 030 short arc, good on light stuff found at home and some limited structural work, they really likely hit the niche for your kind of garage. Even wire is competitive in 10# spools anymore vs the day when 30 # or more ruled. They run on 20A service, lots of goods stuff to be said for them and plenty reason to buck up and buy one, lots of use compared to the cost of a good TV set, last years, fix some stuff, they actually pay back in a hurry. You will fix a couple things and build a couple the thing will be free in 3 months. Cost pennies to put down a couple inches of weld, cheaper than sheet metal screws.
                              http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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