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Welding Stainless Steel

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  • Welding Stainless Steel

    I need to repair a stainless steel steamer tank that is constantly exposed to heat for cooking in a restaurant. I've tried repairing several times but darn thing keeps popping up with leaks! It's starting to get VERY frustrating. Restaurant owner keeps globbing on JB Weld which i've been told isn't very good. Is there a permanent repair for this or am I just doomed?! Please help. Anything helps. Thank you.
    Rick Sisneros
    Owner/Operator Rick Sisneros Gates

  • #2
    I would think something more like "silver solder" may be more appropriate... Depending on how and where cracking is I would consider smoothing it out and laying a layer of stainless over break and use the silver solder.... But I will admit I have not "welded" stainless and all my stainless experience has been small work using silver solder... Also depending on how may times leaking area has been patched it may be time to just replace the offending area, sometimes putting band aids on band aids is just a path to frustration...

    Dale
    Lives his life vicariously through his own self.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ricksgates4135 View Post
      I need to repair a stainless steel steamer tank that is constantly exposed to heat for cooking in a restaurant. I've tried repairing several times but darn thing keeps popping up with leaks! It's starting to get VERY frustrating. Restaurant owner keeps globbing on JB Weld which i've been told isn't very good. Is there a permanent repair for this or am I just doomed?! Please help. Anything helps. Thank you.
      Rick Sisneros
      Owner/Operator Rick Sisneros Gates
      Sounds like you have a hot cracking problem. Find out what type of stainless you are welding, and
      go to this site

      http://www.lincolnelectric.com/asset...LSi/c64000.pdf

      and download Lincoln's Stainless Welding Guide, which covers this, and methods of avoiding.

      However, if this is an internal corrosion problem, large patches of matching stainless or replacement are the only answers.
      Last edited by Northweldor; 03-01-2018, 08:19 PM.

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      • #4
        You might have a problem with chloride stress corrosion cracking (ClSCC). Chlorides (most kitchen cleaners contain bleach or chlorides), temperature (130F up to about 300F, but I've seen it at lower temperatures), and stress (built in from forming, and added when welding) are needed. If the equipment is "infected", you can usually use dye-pen to test but you need to use it knowing you're looking for very tight cracks and tiny pits. It usually starts as fine pitting corrosion, and then the bottom of the pits will develop a crack between them. The crack then propagates. So when it is just starting, you'll see tiny red dots with a tight crack connecting them when using dye-pen. If it's been there a while, then you might see the tiny dots, but the cracking may look more like spider webs. If the problem is local, then you can cut the section out and replace. If the problem is wide spread, then replace the equipment.

        The only other damage mechanisms I can see causing cracking is fatigue and work hardening. But I can't really see that with kitchen equipment, but I guess you never know............

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