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Cutting Stainless Steel

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  • Cutting Stainless Steel

    Hi there, I hope I am in the right forum, I was able to acquire a stainless steel hood range from a restaurant for free if I took it out. So I did and it's pretty big. My question is what are my options for cutting it? It is about 3/32" thick. I want to make a couple vats for boiling maple syrup and make a table top for welding. Thanks in advance.
    "Workshop" - a place to relax and enjoy life.

  • #2
    Plasma, or, lacking that, a 4 1/2" abrasive disc...its not anything special, and your cut edges can be tidied up with a 60 grit flap disc in your grinder. It can be welded easily, but the wire and gas will depend on if you will allow the weld to rust or not.
    You neglected to say what your equipment is...and your experience working with sheet steel.
    "Good Enough Never Is"

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    • #3
      A bi-metal sawzall blade (18 tooth) would be my choice over an abrasive disk.
      Dynasty 300DX
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      • #4
        2 to 1 for the abrasive disc. Much easier to cut a straight line than with the sawzall
        "never argue with an idiot; he'll bring you down to his level, and win by experience"

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        • #5
          Abrasive or Sawzall ... I'd use a 1"x1/8th inch length of steel down for a straight edge. Both tools should follow the line with few issues if you take your time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cyberdiver View Post
            Hi there, I hope I am in the right forum, I was able to acquire a stainless steel hood range from a restaurant for free if I took it out. So I did and it's pretty big. My question is what are my options for cutting it? It is about 3/32" thick. I want to make a couple vats for boiling maple syrup and make a table top for welding. Thanks in advance.
            Some distortion will occur if you use either plasma or or abrasive discs. If you use abrasives, you need to use new discs and take other measures to avoid corrosion contamination in your construction of your maple syrup vats.
            Also, this material would not be very useful as a top for a welding table. Shear cutting or water-jet would be best, but may not be practical.
            Last edited by Northweldor; 11-02-2014, 05:35 AM.

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            • #7
              Northweldor, why wouldn't SS not be a suitable table top for welding? Please explain.
              "Workshop" - a place to relax and enjoy life.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cyberdiver View Post
                Northweldor, why wouldn't SS not be a suitable table top for welding? Please explain.
                The 3/32" thickness will warp and discolor under welding heat, and spatter and grinding sparks will destroy its passivation. You would be better off to build your vats, and trade your excess stainless for 3/8" (or thicker) mild steel plate, for a welding table.

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                • #9
                  Very good info to all. Thank you very much for the replies.
                  "Workshop" - a place to relax and enjoy life.

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                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=Northweldor;529403]...Shear cutting or water-jet would be best.../QUOTE]

                    Yessir, you are correct
                    "never argue with an idiot; he'll bring you down to his level, and win by experience"

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                    • #11
                      I seem to have lost my quick gauge thickness chart, but I have found that an air or electric shear works best for anything under about 18 gauge. A lot less noise, dust and edge damage than a sawzall or a zip wheel.

                      That's what I used when I made my syrup pans.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Big_Eddy View Post
                        I seem to have lost my quick gauge thickness chart, but I have found that an air or electric shear works best for anything under about 18 gauge. A lot less noise, dust and edge damage than a sawzall or a zip wheel.

                        That's what I used when I made my syrup pans.

                        For anything under 18 gauge, Id just use the serrated edge on the side of the Reynolds wrap box
                        Walker
                        Chief slag chipper & floor sweeper
                        Ironwood Artistic

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                        • #13
                          Now that is funny ! I agree

                          Originally posted by walker View Post
                          For anything under 18 gauge, Id just use the serrated edge on the side of the Reynolds wrap box
                          score it with wet noodle and snap !

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