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  • welding test question

    I have over 30 years total TIG welding, over 90% of that purge-welding on SS pipe while building Teflon lined pipe for the chemical/paper industry. got out of welding for a few years, now trying to get back in. it seems like nearly every good paying traveling job (shipyards etc) that advertises for welders to TIG SS pipe then says "you must pass the following test to be hired. " and it is invariably a test where you TIG a root in carbon steel pipe, then either fill & cap with MIG / fluxcore, or fill & cap w/7018. why do they insist on you passing a test that is irrelevant to the work you will be doing? I just cannot wrap my brain around this riddle...

  • #2
    Originally posted by tennetigger View Post
    I have over 30 years total TIG welding, over 90% of that purge-welding on SS pipe while building Teflon lined pipe for the chemical/paper industry. got out of welding for a few years, now trying to get back in. it seems like nearly every good paying traveling job (shipyards etc) that advertises for welders to TIG SS pipe then says "you must pass the following test to be hired. " and it is invariably a test where you TIG a root in carbon steel pipe, then either fill & cap with MIG / fluxcore, or fill & cap w/7018. why do they insist on you passing a test that is irrelevant to the work you will be doing? I just cannot wrap my brain around this riddle...
    They are usually telling their customers that all of their weldors have passed a basic code test, which allows the customer to compare with other shops, which have not established any standard, or, have higher or lower standards.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
      They are usually telling their customers that all of their weldors have passed a basic code test, which allows the customer to compare with other shops, which have not established any standard, or, have higher or lower standards.
      thanks, had not thought of that angle.

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      • #4
        Northweldor is correct. Even if the test does not pertain directly to what you would be doing, it does show you have the ability plus some to do the job at hand, and as northweldor said, the hiring company can use this to please standards that customers may partially set.
        Miller dynasty 350
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        And one fancy microwelding setup

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        • #5
          Did you take the test?

          We had to get "certified" for a government job. We normally just do 16g - 1/4" but 3/8" thick plate was used for coupons. Visual test and taken off site for a bend test. The inspector came and checked the voltage and wire speed on the machines. A couple co workers were using 18-19 volts and making big mig welds. After hammering on a few and seeing no penetration the inspector just said the workers needed to practice and left. I welded about 22.5 volts and 275 inches of .035" wire. I really wanted to use a good quality .045" wire but we did not have any, just .035" and were not told of the test until the inspector arrived.
          My coupon was not tested.
          fence and gate shop worker
          At home...
          Lincoln Power MIG 180..."Big Jake"
          Winco 6000 watt generator (13 hp Honda)

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          • #6
            Sounds like economics. They are using the P1 material because it's the least expensive. You should be qualified up to a P11 material (it's been a while so I could be wrong). Most stainless steels are P8. And you're using multiple processes so you end up qualified for TIG and Stick or whatever.

            We qualify to both material and process. So before we would let you weld stainless pipe, you would weld a stainless pipe coupon using TIG.

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            • #7
              Boy, this post brings back memories...The mil spec test I did on 3/8" steel, 2g, 3g and 4g as I remember they were adamant that the voltage was set to 19v. the .045 wire runs much better at 22v but I guess they figure if you can do the test at 19v you're good.
              Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
              Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
              IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
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              • #8
                On one job, my son got certified on a stainless stick weld, on 1/2" carbon steel plate, I believe it was. His actual job was to stack itty-bitty TIG beads one on top of another onto the end of worn Inconel turbine blades.
                --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                -------------------------
                DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
                Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

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                • #9
                  I really like the help i get from every one its awsome. Im a beginner. And enjoying every day of it ive got a handler 140 its doing the job so far. Im gonna try mig weldind a 3/8 fuel line today. I'll give you all some feed back on just hoe good or bad my results are bless you all a a big thank you for all the great tips and knolage

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Robert davis View Post
                    ... Im gonna try mig weldind a 3/8 fuel line today...
                    A new line, or a repair of a line that had fuel in it?

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