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  • Nickel 55

    Can someone settle a debate my work is having? There is an ongoing debate of if you can use nickel 55 for welding. I believe it is fine to weld with and the other gentleman in my office swears you cannot weld with this material that you have to use a nickel 44 as the nickel 55 is only for ties.
    Anyone have an opinion?

  • #2
    ALLOY DESCRIPTION AN
    D APPLICATION
    ;
    Washington Alloy Nickel 55 is designed for all
    -position joining and
    surfacing of cast iron, malleable iron and ductile iron to itself or dissimilar metals such as mild
    steels,
    stainless steel, wrought alloys or high nickel alloys. A core wire chemistry of
    approximately 55% nickel and 45% iron produces weld deposits with much lower weld
    shrinkage stress which in turn reduces the possibility of weld or heat
    -affected zone cracking.
    Washington Alloy Nickel 55 produces high strength, ductile weld deposits even when welding
    low grade cast iron containing excessive levels of phosphorus or other contaminants.
    Washington Alloy Nickel 55 is especially suited for welding heavy sections such
    as motor
    blocks, housings, machine parts, frames, defective castings and building
    -up worn sections.
    Weld deposits are machinable and the deposit color will approximate that of cast iron.

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    • #3
      What are you calling "ties?"

      As mentioned, the documentation clearly defines it for use in joint welding.

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