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TIG/Silicon Bronze/Cast Iron Exhaust Manifold Repair

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  • TIG/Silicon Bronze/Cast Iron Exhaust Manifold Repair

    The shop up the street was working on a 69 Firebird and blew a hole in the exhaust manifold. They asked if I could fix it and although I had never done anything with cast iron I said I would give it a shot. The following video link details what I did to patch up the manifold. Thanks for watching.

    https://youtu.be/lLe1lsTdvGk
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  • #2
    Certainly looks like you nailed it!
    The more cast I do, the more I like it.
    But my parts don't typically see any heat/cool cycling.
    sigpicViceGrip
    Negative people have a problem for every solution

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    • #3
      Does anyone know what type of cast iron that manifold it is? I don't want to hijack the thread but if it is gray cast iron, your technique might be useful for an "opportunity" () that landed on me last week. It is not subject to heat stress but would have to have good tensile strength which cast isn't the best for (probably why mine broke under tension).

      Edit: BTW, nice video! The time-lapse showing ALL the steps you went through is appreciated.
      Last edited by canoecruiser; 04-21-2016, 09:41 AM.
      CanoeCruiser
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      Two hands, tired body, not enough time...

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      • #4
        Thanks for the kind words by all.

        Originally posted by canoecruiser View Post
        Does anyone know what type of cast iron that manifold it is? I don't want to hijack the thread but if it is gray cast iron, your technique might be useful for an "opportunity" () that landed on me last week. It is not subject to heat stress but would have to have good tensile strength which cast isn't the best for (probably why mine broke under tension).

        Edit: BTW, nice video! The time-lapse showing ALL the steps you went through is appreciated.
        No worries about hijacking. Its all about learning.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DefenderChassis View Post
          The shop up the street was working on a 69 Firebird and blew a hole in the exhaust manifold. They asked if I could fix it and although I had never done anything with cast iron I said I would give it a shot. The following video link details what I did to patch up the manifold. Thanks for watching.

          https://youtu.be/lLe1lsTdvGk
          [ATTACH]38124[/ATTACH]
          [ATTACH]38125[/ATTACH]
          I'm guilty , I have not been here for a while . Nice job on manifold . The way to make it look
          like it has not been repaired is O/A weld it with cast iron rod. Material is the same as the manifold
          and when ground is a color match , also it is the best repair as it expands at the same rate as base
          material.

          Been repairing manifolds and other cast iron for most of 30 years. Some are so thin that you can
          absolutely NOT touch it with any type of arc .

          There should be links to web site and imageevent for you to see some of the old manifolds
          that I get in to repair.
          Lincoln idealarc 250 & HiFreq box for tig
          many torches mostly airco & victor
          bricks & torches for preheat cast iron welding
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          nearly complete automotive shop , no crank grinder

          http://www.georgemillermachine.com
          http://www.imageevent.com/gmachine

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