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Unknown Cast Dock Cleat to A 36

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  • Unknown Cast Dock Cleat to A 36

    I've seen many welded to steel decks, with welds ranging from awful
    to "I wish those were my welds".

    So here's my attempt.
    AC worked better than DCEP, I believe because of how the puddled
    Iron/steel mix responded to the arc.

    Hit an awful inclusion in the middle, and one corner so I tryed fluxcore.
    was pleased, so I dropped a F/C bead in a spot that needed sewing down better.

    FUN... I give me a "4" in the range of "1 to 10" I've seen down at the Harbor.

    Attached Files
    Last edited by vicegrip; 10-28-2015, 09:08 PM.
    sigpicViceGrip
    Negative people have a problem for every solution

  • #2
    What filler metal were you using, and welder settings? While not the most aesthetic welds they look to be worthy of any pull you'd put against them. Myself, I've never been able to make AC current look better than DC reverse but maybe it's just me. If'n it were me I'd have probably warmed the moisture out of that cleat with a rosebud for a bit before jumping onto it with 6010 as a base, (slight weave) and a triple pass with either 7018, or 7014. Certainly not even suggesting you done anything incorrectly, just what I would have done as I have in the past......
    Thanks for reading/listening.

    Antique Hobart Engine Drive Lover X5

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    • #3
      I didn't think to try DCEN to be honest.
      The rods were what I was given to weld cast iron bearing halves together with.
      ....... ? 308L something ?.......... 1/8"
      And I switched to 6013 1/8"
      I think the 6013 side and end is pictured and the 308 in back & under the hammer.

      Amps 115 to 125 maybe.
      Preheat to 200ish both peices.
      sigpicViceGrip
      Negative people have a problem for every solution

      Comment


      • #4
        Example pics

        Advice always cheerfully accepted in this arena!


        Last edited by vicegrip; 10-28-2015, 09:49 PM.
        sigpicViceGrip
        Negative people have a problem for every solution

        Comment


        • #5
          Those cleats I've seen and worked with are cast steel, not iron so a stainless composition rod would not be the best choice. The tensile strength is a bit weak in my opinion. For old, dirty, or rusty steel 6010 on reverse polarity, (electrode positive) is the way to go as it gives a deep penetrating arc. 6013 is a rod I never use for anything as it's very low in penetration and only good for new steel as it doesn't tolerate dirt/rust hardly at all. After a good grinding to remove the former flash, a good deep bead with 6010 at about 90-110 amps would be good followed by 7018 at about 125-135 amps and you'd pull the base metal apart before breaking the welds. I'm referring to 1/8" rod size and you would up the current a little for 5/32" if the base substrate were thick enough to take the heat.
          Thanks for reading/listening.

          Antique Hobart Engine Drive Lover X5

          Comment


          • #6
            Advice taken into serious advisement!
            And thank You!


            Cleats turn out to be cast steel most often, cast Iron other times,
            and Cast who knows what... sometimes.

            My spark test and the deep rust pores both were closer indications to cast iron on this cleat.
            The tie-braker was the powdered gray iron left, where I worked it on my eroded patio
            to get indications to grind the bottom flat. Cast steel would have burnished more
            and left little behind.
            I've even found them bent from heavy loads and still spark out Iron.

            I hoped this one ould be steel when I bought it......
            Because it is going to be a customized Anvil and bumping jig.

            PS< I'd do a pay~check bet, the ebay cleat in these pics IS cast steel.
            Last edited by vicegrip; 10-28-2015, 10:56 PM.
            sigpicViceGrip
            Negative people have a problem for every solution

            Comment


            • #7
              308L is a great multi purpose rod for joining dissimilar metals together but being stainless makes it inherently ductile and soft. Not necessarily a bad thing at all times but something which has to absorb repeated hammer blows could fatigue over time. I can't say I'd suspect that would happen given the amount of weld deposition in this job however.

              I think if I had access to a mill I'd slab off the former welded edges and then machine a bevel into the lower edge perimeter to really gain penetration in the finished weldment. "Dual-Shield" wire will also place a lot of material down at high strength if you have access to doing that.
              Thanks for reading/listening.

              Antique Hobart Engine Drive Lover X5

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Auto Affair View Post
                308L is a great multi purpose rod for joining dissimilar metals together but being stainless makes it inherently ductile and soft. Not necessarily a bad thing at all times but something which has to absorb repeated hammer blows could fatigue over time. I can't say I'd suspect that would happen given the amount of weld deposition in this job however.

                I think if I had access to a mill I'd slab off the former welded edges and then machine a bevel into the lower edge perimeter to really gain penetration in the finished weldment. "Dual-Shield" wire will also place a lot of material down at high strength if you have access to doing that.
                When advised to go ahead and purchase the Beta Mig 250, the rep at Welding Specialty
                told me it's the perfect machine for that, with high wire speed and large diameter serrated feed wheels.
                He also told me to leave the wheel at .035 wire and take it easy. Said on .045 I could get carried away
                and be pulling 400 amps before ya know it!
                sigpicViceGrip
                Negative people have a problem for every solution

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ummm....Phil....you did see those four equally spaced holes around the cleat?
                  Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Those holes are for holding punches and pencils.
                    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                    -------------------------

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      D!ck, I keep 4getn ta call you b4 bed-time dangit.
                      .........
                      Anyway guys...... the cleat bolted to a timber or concrete pier or dock
                      is a suggestion of security to a vessel. A hawser on a cleat that's bolted
                      can sheer those bolts off with a substantial surge of current.

                      Welded down to a deck it has the ability to hold against the strain.
                      I needed it fastened, and bolts would have been fine
                      but then what would I have learned?
                      sigpicViceGrip
                      Negative people have a problem for every solution

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey!
                        It's in Milwaukee, and I here it calling me!
                        http://www.ebay.com/itm/281813532952...%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
                        sigpicViceGrip
                        Negative people have a problem for every solution

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Appears that one has had it's bolt holes welded up?
                          Thanks for reading/listening.

                          Antique Hobart Engine Drive Lover X5

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Auto Affair View Post
                            Appears that one has had it's bolt holes welded up?
                            Cleats on ship decks are welded down. Bolts would be sheared off easily.
                            sigpicViceGrip
                            Negative people have a problem for every solution

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by vicegrip View Post
                              Cleats on ship decks are welded down. Bolts would be sheared off easily.
                              Yes, that's how I've mounted them but your photo appears to have three bolt holes per side which are welded closed?
                              Thanks for reading/listening.

                              Antique Hobart Engine Drive Lover X5

                              Comment

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