Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is this steel grade and what are its properties? Grade: 1530M

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What is this steel grade and what are its properties? Grade: 1530M

    I am trying to find information on the steel used for the extensions of the helical piles that I am using.

    It says that they conform to ASTM576, Grade 1530M with 90ksi minimum yield strength.

    I can not seem to find any info on the grade.


    The issue is that we are welding low carbon steel caps on top of the piles, but some of our welds are breaking from only the weight of a person standing on the edge plate (14" x 14" x 1")

    Thanks

    -Mike

  • #2
    I see some sucker rod is made from grade 1530M. .31 - .36 Carbon plus other alloying elements. What process & filler are you using? Any preheat/post heat?

    http://www.tenaris.com/shared/documents/files/cb24.pdf
    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
    -------------------------

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the reply.

      They are be stick welded on site with no preheat or slow cooling. I couldnt tell you anymore than that as I am not the one welding them...

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by usmcpop View Post
        I see some sucker rod is made from grade 1530M. .31 - .36 Carbon plus other alloying elements. What process & filler are you using? Any preheat/post heat?

        http://www.tenaris.com/shared/documents/files/cb24.pdf
        Without the information requested above, there is no way to answer your question. Describe the whole welding process. Sounds like hydrogen embrittlement, caused by improper WP or filler. Lack of pre and/or post heat could do it.
        Last edited by Northweldor; 11-14-2014, 07:21 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have no contact with the welder unfortunately

          What would the proper process and materials be?

          Are low hydrogen rods a must?

          Comment


          • #6
            At very least use a low-hydrogen process.
            --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

            Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
            -------------------------

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by alpha View Post
              I have no contact with the welder unfortunately

              What would the proper process and materials be?

              Are low hydrogen rods a must?
              Again, with the info you have given, no way to answer your questions. Low hydrogen fillers are no guarantee, lacking pre- and post-heat information, weld process, etc.

              If "some our welds are breaking", how is it that you "have no contact with the welder"???
              Last edited by Northweldor; 11-15-2014, 07:30 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Northweldor View Post
                Again, with the info you have given, no way to answer your questions. Low hydrogen fillers are no guarantee, lacking pre- and post-heat information, weld process, etc.

                If "some our welds are breaking", how is it that you "have no contact with the welder"???
                There is no pre heat, and no post heat being applied.


                A hired welder came onto the construction site to weld on helical pile caps. He simply came, welded, and left. I know they are breaking because I am on the job site.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by alpha View Post
                  There is no pre heat, and no post heat being applied.


                  A hired welder came onto the construction site to weld on helical pile caps. He simply came, welded, and left. I know they are breaking because I am on the job site.
                  As has already been indicated by usmcpop, this was a medium carbon steel being welded to a low carbon steel, and the job-site contractor should have specified the weld procedure completely to the weldor, including the type of filler to be used, the process, preheat, postheat, interpass temperatures, etc, and made sure that they were followed. If this was not done, then the contractor is on the hook for the repairs, which will involve removal, reprep, and doing the job properly. If the weldor has not yet been paid, you can try witholding payment, but if the above was not done, the contractor is responsible.

                  The cause, as I stated above, is likely hydrogen embrittlement, caused by incompetent welding procedures, and the pile manufacturer probably would have supplied the correct pre-qualified procedure with the piles.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X