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Galvanized steel tubing weld-up questions.

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  • Galvanized steel tubing weld-up questions.

    Friends,

    Noob here...forgive me if I placed this question in the wrong forum and sorry for the length of this post.

    I'm just getting back into welding after being out for 12-15 yrs and am not a professional welder by any means. I do have several years of stick welding experience from back in the day, but am having to re-learn the trade.

    I have 3 teenage boys that want to learn to weld, and we have quite a few projects we want to build together. Here's the first one...

    We are starting a project welding up some 1-1/2" thin-wall (.065), mild steel galvanized EMT conduit/tubing (electrician's conduit) to build a couple of L-screens for our local high school baseball facility.

    We live in a football-first town and unfortunately, improvements to our baseball facilities fall on local biz donations and dad's with skillz (and equipment).

    I'm pretty much a noob to mig welding and recently bought a HH 140, which I'd like to use on this project. That being said, I'm totally willing to stick weld if it would give me better results (I have a Miller TB 300/200 AC/DC box).

    FYI-I have read extensively on-line about the hazards of welding up galvie pipe and am quite aware of the precautions needed to avoid breathing the toxic fumes. Glad I read up on that...

    Anyhow, back to my project. I'm going to weld up the pre-bent 90 degree elbows to the straight pieces for this project, and haven't any experience welding thin-wall (.065) pipe/tubing before.

    Here's my questions:

    1) Recs on breathing apparatus or chemical masks that are practical under a welding hood??

    2) Would I be better off mig or stick welding this type of tubing??

    3) Which size wire for mig and/or which size & type of electrode would you recommend for this application??

    4) What machine settings would you recommend starting with whether mig or stick welding for this application?? Amperage range, DCEP v. DCEN??

    5) I've read about dipping the to-be-welded joints in muriatic acid to remove the galvanized coating on the metal prior to welding. Any thoughts on such a process??


    Thanks in advance,

    DC

    Last edited by DonnieC; 02-11-2011, 12:51 AM.

  • #2
    I vote mig, .023 wire C25. I would flap wheel the zinc back better than an inch from the joint, try maybe a stiff bottle brush in a drill if you can find it to clean the ID. Haven't tried muriatic acid or any of the other chem-strip methods.

    If conduit is strong enough would PVC or CPVC pipe be strong enough? Never rusts, is lighter, and tends to spring back from minor bends better too. Close to the same price and anyone can glue up repairs after your kids are out of the system.

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    • #3
      Please wear your welding mask and drink lots of milk after.

      Comment


      • #4
        Hobart Fabshield 21-B mig wire works good on galvanized, use it quite often, burn off the zinc with your torch & keep your head out of the smoke plume. If you start to taste it it's time for fresh air, old timers always drank milk after welding galvanized.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by old skool View Post
          Hobart Fabshield 21-B mig wire works good on galvanized, use it quite often, burn off the zinc with your torch & keep your head out of the smoke plume. If you start to taste it it's time for fresh air, old timers always drank milk after welding galvanized.
          Had a brain fart, sorry, meant to say Fabshield 21-B Flux core.

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          • #6
            I am all for Muratic Acid to remove the galv and i do it. But drinking milk is just a myth. Wear a good respirator. A guy where i work told me to drink milk and i said do i use a straw to suck it up my nose because its getting fumes too...Bob
            Bob Wright, Grandson of Tee Nee Boat Trailer Founder
            Metal Master Fab
            Salem, Ohio
            Birthplace of the Silver & Deming Drill
            http://www.ceilingtrains.com/
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/sawking/
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/southbend10k/

            Comment


            • #7
              Well the OP started this thread back in February, I hope he got the project done by now.
              Now a question for all those that belive in drinking milk after welding galvanized steel. Can it be chocolate or strawberry flavored??
              I have never drank milk (any flavor) after welding galvanized steel; I just try to stay out of the plume of smoke and be upwind of it or, a fan blowing. In my younger years I did neither and I could taste it, yum yum.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Originally posted by SAWDADDY View Post
                maybe a stiff bottle brush in a drill if you can find it to clean the ID.
                My favorite way to clean the inside diameter is with a smaller flap wheel mounted on an extended drill shaft. I've used that method in my profession (not welding) and it worked well. A lot like using a cylinder hone. Come to think of it, a brake cylinder hone from the local auto parts store could do the trick as well, plus, they're adjustable. When finished honing, you can wrap a shop towel around the stones and soak in alcohol to swab the ID of the pipe/tube.

                Greg
                The truth is out there, but the server's not responding.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
                  I am all for Muratic Acid to remove the galv and i do it. But drinking milk is just a myth. Wear a good respirator. A guy where i work told me to drink milk and i said do i use a straw to suck it up my nose because its getting fumes too...Bob
                  Drinking milk is a myth.....
                  Milk would be good if you ingested small amounts of zinc. if you are getting this stuff in your mouth, you're doing something wrong
                  The proper gear to wear for welding galvie would be a PAPR helmet.
                  "Powered Air Purified Respirator".
                  Miller makes one and it's approximately $1200....
                  Yeah, big investment!
                  Anyway, clean off the areas to be welded using any one of the afore mentioned methods and keep your head out of the plume.....
                  ESAB OXY-Welding setup
                  Millermatic 211
                  Millermatic 251
                  Miller Dialarc HF
                  Miller Dynasty 200DX
                  Hobart BetaMig 2510
                  Light to industrial fabrication
                  6G TIG & Stick

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                  • #10
                    Here is a thread on respirators. More than you probably want to know about respirators thread link

                    Removing Galvanized plating the easy way link

                    Just in case you don't know.
                    The symptoms are nonspecific but are generally flu-like including fever, chills, nausea, headache, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pains. A sweet or metallic taste in the mouth which distorts the taste of food and cigarettes is also normally reported along with a dry or irritated throat which may lead to hoarseness. Symptoms may also include a burning sensation in the body, shock, no urine output, collapse, convulsions, shortness of breath, yellow eyes or yellow skin, rash, vomiting, watery or bloody diarrhea or low blood pressure, which require prompt medical attention. Milder flu-like symptoms will normally disappear within 24 to 48 hours, and someone suffering from metal fume fever will usually feel well enough to return to work the next day, despite the fact that they may still be feeling a little bit under the weather. It often takes 4 days to fully recover.

                    Diagnosis of metal fume fever can be difficult, as the complaints are non-specific and resemble a number of other common illnesses. When respiratory symptoms are prominent, metal fume fever may be confused with acute bronchitis. The diagnosis is based primarily upon a history of exposure to metal oxide fumes.

                    An interesting feature of metal fume fever involves rapid adaptation to the development of the syndrome following repeated metal oxide exposure. Workers with a history of recurrent metal fume fever often develop a tolerance to the fumes. This tolerance, however, is transient, and only persists through the work week. After a weekend hiatus, the tolerance has usually disappeared. This phenomenon of tolerance is what led to the name "Monday Fever".

                    Prevention of metal fume fever in workers who are at potential risk (such as welders) involves avoidance of direct contact with potentially toxic fumes, improved engineering controls (exhaust ventilation systems), personal protective equipment (respirators), and education of workers regarding the features of the syndrome itself and proactive measures which can be taken to prevent its development.

                    As far as the milk goes, it will settle your queasy stomach!

                    Stop and think about some thing, you breathe the zinc fumes into"YOUR LUNGS" not "YOUR STOMACH". You don't "INHALE MILK INTO YOUR LUNGS". It might help as it has been stated if you have a mild case of zinc dust in your mouth or stomach. It will do nothing for the particulates from the zinc fumes in "YOUR LUNGS"

                    Also hankies,rags across the face and nose don't help much.
                    So buy either an approved disposable or replaceable filters mask for welding fumes.

                    All you have to do is look around at all the people dragging either the medical oxy cylinders or the oxy concentrators around at your local stores or Wally world!
                    glen, been there, done that and probably broke it!If you aren't on the edge. You'r taking up to much room

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