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My first tig welds

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  • My first tig welds

    with my new to me syncrowave 250. I was able to give it a try today for a little while. I need to get more steel to practice on. It seems like I can get the most bang for the buck out of 1" flat stock cut into pieces for practice material.

    I need to get dip timing down and keeping it uniform and in a straight line. I noticed one other problem im having is a little crater at the end of the weld What causes that? I have read its from not enough filler at the end so I tried feeding it a lot at the end and backing off the pedal slowly but it would still happen sometimes.

    Should the filler go through the pieces of metal and be visible on the back side of the weld? On some welds if I went slower it would come through a little. I am welding on top of a steel table. I am not sure if I was welding and the material was elevated, would I be blowing through by having it come out on the back side of the weld.

    Here is the picture.

    100 amps, 3/32 thoriated tungsten, 15cfm argon, 5 second post flow, 1/8"x1" flat stock, no gap, butt weld

    Last edited by Dave I; 07-05-2010, 09:06 PM.

  • #2
    Dave, if those are your first TIG welds, they are excellent for a first attempt. I took much longer to get that smooth and I still have "issues" sometimes. Keep practicing, you can only get better from here!!! Might try moving slightly to the front of the puddle and adding a small amount of filler as you gently reduce pedal pressure to fill the craters.
    Bob
    Enough tools to do anything, common sense to use em properly.
    Big nasty scar, no kidneys, so you think you got issues?

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    • #3
      You have good rhythm, and yes, you should not see the fit-up line on the back side. You can eliminate the crater hole by either drawing the torch back over the previous weld, while backing off the foot pedal, or making a small circle while backing off, but keep the torch moving as you reduce current.
      Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
      Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
      IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
      IF YOU'RE READING THIS IN ENGLISH, THANK A SOLDIER!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Rocky D View Post
        and yes, you should not see the fit-up line on the back side.
        Ok, it sounds like I either need to up the heat or slow down and melt it longer because even where it did go through to the other side I can still see some of the line. I think I will make something to prop up the object im welding off of the table so I can get a feel for whether its going to burn through or not. My ultimate goal is to be able to weld tubing of different thicknesses.

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        • #5
          With enough practice, you will be able to see the puddle drop through.
          Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
          Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
          IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
          IF YOU'RE READING THIS IN ENGLISH, THANK A SOLDIER!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Rocky D View Post
            With enough practice, you will be able to see the puddle drop through.
            LOL @ Rocky D. Only because I know exactly what he is referring to.
            -----------------------
            Eric H. Smith
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