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welding up a new workbench

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  • welding up a new workbench

    I'm in the process of making a workbench to hold my small 9x20 lathemaster lathe and a small press for broaching.

    The one pic shows the top so far. I've reinforced the ends a bit more than the middle because that's where the majority of the weight will sit. Tube is 4x4" 3/16". The shelf down below won't be quite as beefy as the top, and the whole thing will sit on 4" galvanized casters (they don't move easily, so I'll have to use a diggin bar to move it, but even that will help if stuff falls behind etc.

    The top will have 1/4" plate, 42"x72". I will weld some angle to the top to better connect to the 4x4 tube on the top.

    I'm using a MM210 set on 3/52. Do the welds look ok? I'm still learning.

  • #2
    top frame shot

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    • #3
      This thing is strong enough to set a Bobcat on! Way overkill! The welds are a little rough, but should hold...be sure to wrap the corners. You might experiment with different weaves to see which one works best for you. I use this one mostly.

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      • #4
        It's plenty heavy enough that's for sure.
        Esab Multimaster 260 Sweet machine!
        Thermal Arc Arc Master, Don't use it much just got a heck of a deal on this unit
        Don't talk about it, be about it.

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        • #5
          Is this .030 wire with C25 gas? If so, I'd try about 4/45 on a MM 210 on 1/4" to 3/16" material. The welds in the pics look a little light on heat to me, especially the first 3. I'm not trying to be critical, the welds don't look too bad, but I think I'd try a little higher tap and see what it will do.
          Jim

          Miller MM 210
          Miller Dialarc 250P
          Airco 225 engine driven
          Victor O/A
          Lots of other tools and always wanting more

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          • #6
            Rocky, thanks, I'll give that a shot. Wrapping the corners will be touch as on the sides there is a 1/8"+ gap. Maybe what I'll do is slide some 1/16" steel in the gap then weld that.

            Jim - thanks, I'll try it. Yes, it's .030 wire. Please don't hesitate to be critical, because that's the only way I'll learn. Thanks.

            On the overkill thing, yeah, I know it's overkill, but I'm looking for mass to keep the vibration down since a small lathe will sit on top of it. I was thinking of filling the long sections and risers with sand but wasn't sure how the sand would impact the welding.

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            • #7
              Sack, that is what MIG is all about...gaps. You can easily fill a 1/8" gap no slug needed. Have at it!

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              • #8
                yes! I second that! no need at all to fill a gap like that. just fill it with your puddle!
                http://theaceofgates.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jim-Tx View Post
                  Is this .030 wire with C25 gas? If so, I'd try about 4/45 on a MM 210 on 1/4" to 3/16" material. The welds in the pics look a little light on heat to me, especially the first 3. I'm not trying to be critical, the welds don't look too bad, but I think I'd try a little higher tap and see what it will do.
                  Thanks Jim. 4/45 made a HUGE difference. Thanks.

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                  • #10
                    Hello Everybody

                    That's true.What you said help me a lot.Thanks.

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