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  • vicegrip
    replied
    OK , I give!

    Shiny / Flat , Flat / Shiny.


    Probably Quantum Physics.

    VG

    Leave a comment:


  • GSSFC
    replied
    Originally posted by vicegrip View Post
    Pends on what Yer Weld'n.

    Keep hit'n a table with a side gringer at random. Fine for a sow's ear.
    Want to do a silk purse, table needs ta be flat!

    No more effort to get it clean & flat,
    than do'n some nice gentel hill's and valleys. If yer into landscapes.

    Cheers
    VG

    The thing that amazes me is the abillity that some folks have to,
    Shed any expantion of what they allready think they know.

    Or "Will Rogers" "what they know that just ain't so."
    Man it's gorgeous out-side today, See Ya.
    Naa, doesn't even need to be flat or close, the plate is good enough for me. I just do rough stuff, jeep stuff. Need a rugged surface, precision isn't key. HOWEVER, I need it clean enough that I can tack to for fab work or place the ground clamp on the edge and toss my work somewhere on the table and weld away. That kind of "shiny"

    Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • vicegrip
    replied
    Originally posted by GSSFC View Post
    WTF...hehe!
    Ok not shiny, how about clean?? Conducive to a surface good for welding?
    Tim

    Pends on what Yer Weld'n.

    Keep hit'n a table with a side gringer at random. Fine for a sow's ear.
    Want to do a silk purse, table needs ta be flat!

    No more effort to get it clean & flat,
    than do'n some nice gentel hill's and valleys. If yer into landscapes.

    Cheers
    VG

    The thing that amazes me is the abillity that some folks have to,
    Shed any expantion of what they allready think they know.

    Or "Will Rogers" "what they know that just ain't so."
    Man it's gorgeous out-side today, See Ya.

    Leave a comment:


  • GSSFC
    replied
    Originally posted by vicegrip View Post
    GSSFC:
    "I expected to hit it with the grinder and it would be all shiny underneath. What gives??"

    I'll define the "Trades" as machinists / tool-makers / pattern-makers /
    even millwrites / who are often fine machinsts.

    Shiny!
    Unless you are dealing with Chrome, or pollished surfaces,
    always avoid using the term "Shiny" to connotate possitive attributes
    to the surfaces of your machining / grinding / what-ever.
    And especially "flatness" !!
    Never never never, use shiny to describe a result you are
    referring to as addaquitely "flat".

    You might as well forget to ware pants, or have spinach on your chin.
    Shiny in practicing reality has absolutely nothing to do with
    the accuracy of generated surfaces.

    Infact often in means that the surface-producing tool,
    is not what it should be. Surface-grinding, Blanchard grinding,
    even turning in many alloys, are aplications where shiny
    is really a finger-print that indentifies a crime.

    Shiny is nearly always the result of burnishing,
    or on a microscopic level smearing of the surface.
    I could go on and on, but I'm boring even myself.

    Just a heads up.
    I have often revealed my innocent naievaty, in the world of welding,
    careing not, because it's more important to me to learn the facts.
    But when you are in mixed company, keep shiny in your watch-pocket.
    You'll be glad you did.

    Have a Good Week.
    VG
    WTF...hehe!

    Ok not shiny, how about clean?? Conducive to a surface good for welding?

    Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • vicegrip
    replied
    Originally posted by whateg0 View Post
    Phil, you can uncover your ears now. Phil. PHIL. PHIL!!!!

    Dave
    Good night Dave!

    vg

    Leave a comment:


  • whateg0
    replied
    Sorry, Phil. I didn't realize you were listening. Cover your ears for this.

    (whispering so Phil doesn't hear...) I'll stick by my description of shiny in weldor's company. Mirror-like doesn't quite fit unless you are using a fine grit flap-disk. Having a certain luster? Maybe. No, clean steel freshly hit with a grinder is shiny.

    Phil, you can uncover your ears now. Phil. PHIL. PHIL!!!!

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • vicegrip
    replied
    A naughty word in "the Trades"

    Originally posted by whateg0 View Post
    Grind down far enough and it will be shiny. You probably have a lot of pitting and such to get through before that, though. If it's that bad off, it's probably just not suitable for something cosmetic. If you want to get rid of the rust, you could always use phosphoric acid, but the surface will still be rough.
    Dave
    GSSFC:
    "I expected to hit it with the grinder and it would be all shiny underneath. What gives??"

    I'll define the "Trades" as machinists / tool-makers / pattern-makers /
    even millwrites / who are often fine machinsts.

    Shiny!
    Unless you are dealing with Chrome, or pollished surfaces,
    always avoid using the term "Shiny" to connotate possitive attributes
    to the surfaces of your machining / grinding / what-ever.
    And especially "flatness" !!
    Never never never, use shiny to describe a result you are
    referring to as addaquitely "flat".

    You might as well forget to ware pants, or have spinach on your chin.
    Shiny in practicing reality has absolutely nothing to do with
    the accuracy of generated surfaces.

    Infact often in means that the surface-producing tool,
    is not what it should be. Surface-grinding, Blanchard grinding,
    even turning in many alloys, are aplications where shiny
    is really a finger-print that indentifies a crime.

    Shiny is nearly always the result of burnishing,
    or on a microscopic level smearing of the surface.
    I could go on and on, but I'm boring even myself.

    Just a heads up.
    I have often revealed my innocent naievaty, in the world of welding,
    careing not, because it's more important to me to learn the facts.
    But when you are in mixed company, keep shiny in your watch-pocket.
    You'll be glad you did.

    Have a Good Week.
    VG
    Last edited by vicegrip; 07-20-2009, 01:15 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • old blue
    replied
    I agree about the regional effect on the plate/sheet nomenclature. I was referring to my supplier's (Triple S Steel) jargon.


    What I get a kick out of is when somebody calls 1/4" flat bar "plate".

    Leave a comment:


  • ptsideshow
    replied
    Originally posted by midnightbrwr View Post
    PT I was thinking about plug welds but I thought it might not work so well and I was also wondering what kind of rust you would get between the two plates. On the plate vs the sheet thing I am a little confused because wikipedia indicated that plate is above 6mm or 1/4 inch?
    Originally posted by old blue
    Not true.
    3/16" & up are called plate.
    7 gauge (.179") and down are sheet.
    Originally posted by Rocky D
    Yeah, above 1/4" it's considered plate,
    Well so am I as it looks like it depends on what source, supplier or region you are from or you look at on the net. I found one that doesn't consider or stock anything under 3/8" as plate.

    Around here I guess 1/8" is Detroit plate since sheet metal is what they used to build cars out of!

    I will go with the consensus here of 1/4"

    Leave a comment:


  • whateg0
    replied
    Grind down far enough and it will be shiny. You probably have a lot of pitting and such to get through before that, though. If it's that bad off, it's probably just not suitable for something cosmetic. If you want to get rid of the rust, you could always use phosphoric acid, but the surface will still be rough.

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • GSSFC
    replied
    How do you clean up plate that looks like that? I have some, but it is a bear to clean. I don't know what "kind" of steel it is. But the grinding wheel has little effect on it. I expected to hit it with the grinder and it would be all shiny underneath. What gives??

    Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • whateg0
    replied
    Solid wood doesn't swell the way MDF or particle board do.

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by midnightbrwr View Post
    PT I was thinking about plug welds but I thought it might not work so well and I was also wondering what kind of rust you would get between the two plates. On the plate vs the sheet thing I am a little confused because wikipedia indicated that plate is above 6mm or 1/4 inch?
    Yeah, above 1/4" it's considered plate, Plug welds will give you some warpage, too, and be undesirable. The wood clad with the plate is ok as long as the wood is at least 1.5" thick, like a 2x6, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • old blue
    replied
    1/8" is SHEET

    And a bit of info anything that is measured in fraction of inch 1/8" or thicker is called plate, anything that is measured in gauge 12,16,20 is sheet.
    Not true.
    3/16" & up are called plate.
    7 gauge (.179") and down are sheet.

    Leave a comment:


  • midnightbrwr
    replied
    Dave, that is a good point. The thing is there is some wafer board laying around here that I could use under the steel (free). On its own I think this stuff would suck and I would probably never use it. I have some more of the same cabinets in my garage that I topped with MDF and sealed with urethane, despite that the MDF still sucks up liquids and gets swollen. What kind of wood is your counter made from?

    Leave a comment:

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