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Steel plate from sheet metal?

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  • midnightbrwr
    replied
    Dave, that is a good point. The thing is there is some wafer board laying around here that I could use under the steel (free). On its own I think this stuff would suck and I would probably never use it. I have some more of the same cabinets in my garage that I topped with MDF and sealed with urethane, despite that the MDF still sucks up liquids and gets swollen. What kind of wood is your counter made from?

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  • whateg0
    replied
    Depending on the work being done, it is sometimes nice to have wooden benchtops, even if they do soak up some oil. I like using wooden benches for working on aluminum heads, for example. The wood gives before the aluminum so it doesn't mar it or ding corners and such. The downside is that you have to watch for stuff that gets embedded in the surface.

    Dave

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  • midnightbrwr
    replied
    Originally posted by ptsideshow View Post
    Even if you would punch holes in the sheets and weld the inside areas to the sheet below you still would have heat distortions between the welds.

    And a bit of info anything that is measured in fraction of inch 1/8" or thicker is called plate, anything that is measured in gauge 12,16,20 is sheet.
    PT I was thinking about plug welds but I thought it might not work so well and I was also wondering what kind of rust you would get between the two plates. On the plate vs the sheet thing I am a little confused because wikipedia indicated that plate is above 6mm or 1/4 inch?

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  • midnightbrwr
    replied
    Originally posted by whateg0 View Post
    If you are just meaning a general workbench, then go for it. Seems a better use of the thinner stuff than a welding bench, since you do have the 1/2" plate.

    Dave
    Yea I want work bench tops. I am going to set up 15' on one side of our shop. I got a bunch of nice cabinets from a lab remodel but was unable to get the black chemical resistant tops they originally had. I am going to put plywood on top and thought metal would be good because it won't soak up oil etc. On the other side of our shop I already have 15' with Formica tops, but those are strictly used for clean stuff because we use them for butchering.

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  • ptsideshow
    replied
    As been said putting numerous sheets together is a pain and will cause localized heat distortion in the inside areas that are not attached to each other.Better use the thicker material even if you have to cut it down. You can always use the drops for something else.

    Even if you would punch holes in the sheets and weld the inside areas to the sheet below you still would have heat distortions between the welds.

    And a bit of info anything that is measured in fraction of inch 1/8" or thicker is called plate, anything that is measured in gauge 12,16,20 is sheet.

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  • whateg0
    replied
    Just use the 1/2" plate and save yourself the headache of trying to get the 3/16" stuff lined up and attached. I suspect that the overall rigidity of the 3/16" sandwich will not be equal to that of the 1/2".

    I would not advise using wood for a welding bench, even if it is clad in sheets of something else. I know it is done, and with 3/16" it would probably be okay, but it seems like a good place for some smoldering to go undetected for a long time. If you are just meaning a general workbench, then go for it. Seems a better use of the thinner stuff than a welding bench, since you do have the 1/2" plate.

    Just MHO.

    I guess I should add that if you need the bigger space that the 4x5 sheet gives you, then go for it. I know that more space is always better. Maybe make a couple of welding tables that can be put together for bigger stuff. I don't know. Just thinking.

    Dave

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