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Angle Iron-Which Way Is Stronger?

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  • Angle Iron-Which Way Is Stronger?

    Hello: I want to use some scrap angle-iron to act as bracing members for wood running perpendicular on top, for a project, and wondered which would be stronger. Basically you can position angle-iron in different ways, just wondered which was stronger for lack of flexing. Attached Picture is looking at angle iron's position at the end. Any thoughts?

    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    I would think #1 in your picture, but I could definitely be wrong. just from handling it, seems that there would be more deflection under load in #2 or #3 orientation than in #1. I would do a test with a known weight and measure deflection in all positions on say, a 10 foot piece over a fixed gap.
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    • #3
      Still need a bit more information to answer the question. What direction will the wood be running with relation to the angle? Method of attachment to the angle?
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      • #4
        #1.

        Take a 20' piece of angle and balance it, holding it in the middle. #1 will flex the ends down much less than the others, and be easier to attach at the same time.

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        • #5
          Very nice graphic illustration, by the way.
          --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Wyoming View Post
            Still need a bit more information to answer the question. What direction will the wood be running with relation to the angle? Method of attachment to the angle?
            Attached is another picture, showing the layout I was planning. Thanks.

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            • #7
              #1. MAC702 said all that is necessary.
              Two turn tables and a microphone.

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              • #8
                Bottom line...Mac is right...as per usual.
                Miller 251, Lincoln PrecisionTig 275, Miller DialArc 250 AC/DC, Hypertherm 900, Bridgeport J-head, Jet 14" lathe, South Bend 9" lathe, Hossfeld bender with a collection of dies driving me to the poorhouse, Logan shaper, Ellis 3000 bandsaw, Royersford drill press and a Victor Journeyman O/A.

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                • #9
                  Yes and No

                  Originally posted by Wyoming View Post
                  Bottom line...Mac is right...as per usual.

                  Mac's right per the question.
                  The question is based on a miss-applicaton.

                  Actually angle-iron is not meant to be load-bearing across it's section.
                  It is made to be used in "tension" situations, providing two surfaces
                  square to each other at the ends for attachment to the
                  (object requiring latteral reinforcing).

                  Channel is the preferred product you may want to considering,
                  based on structural applicication.
                  Yes angle is used this way in many applications including bed-frames, but
                  if you really desire / need good support, channel is a better choice.
                  sigpicViceGrip
                  Negative people have a problem for every solution

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                  • #10
                    Maybe it was originally called dangle iron?
                    --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

                    Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
                    -------------------------
                    DialArc 250 (1974), Idealarc 250 (1971), SyncroWave 250 w/Coolmate 3, SP-175+, TA 161STL,
                    Lincwelder AC180C (circa 1952), Victor & Smith's O/A, Dayton (Miller) spot welder, 1200 sq.ft. of garage filled with crap and a kid that can actually run the stuff +++

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                    • #11
                      I agree with Vicegrip.

                      Channel would be a much better choice in this application.
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                      • #12
                        Key reason that commercially built trailiers use channel!

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                        • #13
                          If you have angle and want to make use of it, #1 is the best orientation. It will also be easier to attach stuff to. Channel or box could be better in this application BUT I think once the boards are tied into the angles it will stiffen them up just fine. Nice graphics, BTW!
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                          • #14
                            way to use angle-iron for bearing lateral load

                            two opposed members, are required for load-carying applications.
                            Example , say a weld-table top.



                            cheers
                            vg
                            sigpicViceGrip
                            Negative people have a problem for every solution

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for all your input on this everyone. This website is extremely helpful from very knowledgeable folks!

                              I definitely agree that channel would be better, but I had a bunch of angle around so thought that would be better.

                              I went with option #1 and seems to be very stiff.

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