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Fitting Square Tubing Inside Square Tubing?

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  • Fitting Square Tubing Inside Square Tubing?

    Does anyone know of a chart that would list what tubing sizes fit nicely inside a larger tubing size? I'd like to use about 1.5" square tubing for my welding table legs and then use a smaller size to fit inside the lower leg with a series of holes and a pin to adjust the height of the table. Just your basic male/female interface like a receiver hitch/drawbar except I'll make 4 or 5 holes about an inch apart so that I can adjust the height.

  • #2
    http://www.ryerson.com/stocklist/Sto...=GetHome&REF=1
    The link will take you to Ryerson's stock list, they list just about everything you can think of. A little basic math using the OD's and wall thickness and there you go. Whether you can get it at your supplier or not???
    Keep in mind the material will have some variation, not EXACTLY what the book says it should be. Also, will the tube have a weld seam in it? Sorry if I'm bringing more questions than answers, maybe someone can give you an answer on what works from experience.

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    • #3
      Cool. I printed out some Inch, Decimal, MM, Gauge tables this morning so I'm getting a better idea of sizing standards. I was wondering abut the uniformity of the wall diameter and I didn't know about the weld seam at all. I guess I'll just have to experiment a bit. Thanks.

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      • #4
        All of the tube I was able to find had a seam in it that made what looks like a good fit on paper NOT a good fit in reality. The next smaller size than what I though I need was what would fit. And then I would have end up with a sloppy fit unless I did lots of things to make it work.

        I thought about coughing up the cash to buy 10 feet of receiver tube - about $5 per foot - and using that. It does not have the seam on the inside and 2 inch outside tube fits in it perfectly.

        And then I thought about just using sidewinder trailer jacks for the legs. Expensive [$20 per leg was the cheapest I could find at Harbor Freight] but I was only going to make one table very adjustable table so ...

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        • #5
          You might be able to rig up something to plane that seam down a bit, like a broach.
          --- RJL ----------------------------------------------

          Ordinarily I'm insane, but I have lucid moments when I'm merely stupid.
          -------------------------

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          • #6
            There are a couple sises in that range of common tubing that fit pretty close, seems like 1 1/2 and 1 1/4 maybe. Its not something I would likely mess with, pick a good working hight, even experiment a bit first and live with it. I dont find I normally want to change it, not significant enough to warrant the effort.
            http://www.facebook.com/cary.urka.urkafarms

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            • #7
              McMaster has this:
              Arcin' and sparkin', Rocky D <><
              Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it.
              IF YOU CAN READ THIS, THANK A TEACHER...
              IF YOU'RE READING THIS IN ENGLISH, THANK A SOLDIER!

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              • #8
                I would go with a fixed height of table. The little bit of movement the tubing would give you would drive me nuts. I have a very heavy table and had to put bolts on the bottom of the legs to remove all possible tipping movement.

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                • #9
                  What I have done in the past is to cut up a trailer hitch receiver from the junkyard. You can find them in either 2" square or 1.25"square.

                  Weld a couple of flange nuts on adjacent sides to push the inner square firmly into the corner of the tube so it can't wobble.
                  Expect stupidity, and you'll rarely be disappointed.

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                  • #10
                    Look for .100 wall tubing. It's quite common around my area. As long as the outside tubing has the .100 wall, the next size smaller fits nicely inside.

                    1 1/2 X .100w and 1 1/4 tube. 1 1/4 X .100 and 1" tube. 1 X .100w and 3/4 tube.
                    D. Paulson

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                    • #11
                      Tubing Seam

                      We do this quite often. We like to make sections of our guardrails removable when guarding elevated work platforms. We will make the pocket 2.5" square tube (1/4" wall). The legs on the guardrail are 2" square tube. We do have to remove the seam in the 2.5" pocket. The way we work around this is to use a Dynabrade Dynafile to remove as much of the seam as possible. We then peck the leg into the pocket to locate the seam and, if there is still an interfence, LIGHTLY make a groove in the leg with the edge of a grinder.

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                      • #12
                        why not use 2 3/8 tubing and 2 7/8 tubing they fit together very well

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                        • #13
                          put square tubing in a round pipe..................

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