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Welded aluminum boat

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  • Welded aluminum boat

    I am looking at buying an aluminum boat but I am a little concerned that it was welded.
    The owner said that he bought it from a friend of his who welded it. He had the boat for 6 years and it has been holding up with no leaks. I will take it on the water to see for myself.
    I just want a second opinion on the weld. If you are experienced with welding aluminum boats please look at the picture and give me your opinion.Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    I know area where welds are is thin material.... But picture does not show welds really well, but I get impression its pretty much bubblegum...

    EDIT:... If it were mine I would have had damaged area cut out and had new material TIG welded in by professional...

    Dale
    Last edited by Dale M.; 04-14-2016, 07:58 AM.
    "Fear The Government That Wants To Take Your Guns" - Thomas Jefferson..

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tom Kleinhans View Post
      I am looking at buying an aluminum boat but I am a little concerned that it was welded.
      The owner said that he bought it from a friend of his who welded it. He had the boat for 6 years and it has been holding up with no leaks. I will take it on the water to see for myself.
      I just want a second opinion on the weld. If you are experienced with welding aluminum boats please look at the picture and give me your opinion.[ATTACH]38106[/ATTACH]
      Need close-ups, but under magnification, definitely not a professional-looking weld. Probably done with mig, rather than tig. If leak tight, may be fine, but I would definitely deduct cost of repair from purchase price, in case it isn't. Also, closely inspect all other stress areas of the boat for cracking/work-hardening.
      Last edited by Northweldor; 04-14-2016, 09:57 AM.

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      • #4
        Definitely should inspect it carefully for work-hardened or signs of fatigue as suggested. I would like to know what happened to it to cause it to need repair (beyond the short answer "it cracked").

        How much has the boat been used since the repair?
        Used on salt water?
        Signs of corrosion, loose rivets, rotted wood, cracked or sun-faded plastic or upholstery, etc?
        Did the boat get slammed around in heavy chop or used on a flat water lake with a no-wake speed restriction?
        Are there any signs of abuse like dents, bent gunwales, heavy scrapes, pier-crashes?

        If the boat has been on the water a fair amount without leaking for six years, and the answers to the above are "no" (excepting the first question on use), it could be fine as is. But only you can see if it is water worthy or ready to be "recycled".

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